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Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years. When this falls on July 29, the gospel for the Memorial of Saints Martha, Mary, and Lazarus is used.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Exodus 33:7-11; 34:5b-9, 28: Moses pitched the meeting tent outside the camp for consulting the LORD. The cloud signaled God’s presence. Moses spoke with God face to face, proclaiming His merciful and gracious nature. Moses sought God’s favor for the people, staying with Him for forty days and nights to write the Ten Commandments.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Jeremiah 14:17-22: Tears flow ceaselessly for the destruction of the people. Hunger and death prevail. God’s apparent rejection raises questions. They seek peace and healing but face terror. Acknowledging sins, they implore God not to spurn them and remember the covenant. They recognize God’s power as the one true source.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 103: The Lord is kind and merciful, upholding justice, and abounding in love. His forgiveness surpasses our sins, and His compassion extends to those who fear Him, reminding us to walk in His ways and extend kindness to others.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2)- Psalm 79: Lord, deliver us and forgive our sins for the sake of Your glorious name. Hear the cries of the afflicted, free the prisoners, and let us forever give thanks and praise to You, our Shepherd.
  • Gospel Matthew 13:36-43: Jesus explains the parable of the weeds to his disciples. He reveals that the Son of Man will send his angels to separate the righteous from the evildoers, and the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father, while the evildoers will face judgment and be thrown into the fiery furnace.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Jesus’ Explanation of the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares: The passage begins with Jesus explaining the parable of the wheat and the tares to His disciples, providing insights into its meaning.
  • The Coexistence of the Righteous and the Wicked: Jesus reiterates the coexistence of the righteous and the wicked in the world until the end of the age, illustrating the reality of good and evil existing together.
  • The Final Judgment: Jesus foretells the coming judgment when the Son of Man will send His angels to separate the wicked from the righteous, bringing justice and accountability for everyone’s actions.
  • Eternal Destiny: The passage emphasizes the eternal destiny of the righteous, who will shine like the sun in the Kingdom of their Father, and the fate of the wicked, who will be thrown into the fiery furnace.
  • God’s Faithful Servants: Jesus describes the righteous as God’s children and His faithful servants, demonstrating the special relationship between God and those who follow His ways.
  • The Assurance of God’s Justice: The passage assures believers that God’s justice will prevail in the end, rewarding the righteous and punishing the wicked, and bringing ultimate resolution to the coexistence of good and evil.

He who sows good seed is the Son of Man, the field is the world, the good seed the children of the kingdom.

Thoughts for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

In the parable of the wheat and weeds, explained by Jesus in the gospel for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:36-43), we encounter a powerful reminder of the reality of the end times. Jesus emphasizes the urgency to grow like wheat, drawing closer to the Lord and living according to His will.

As we journey through life, we are surrounded by distractions and temptations—the weeds—that can hinder our spiritual growth and relationship with God. These distractions may cause us to neglect daily prayer or delay acts of kindness and service to others. They may also lead us to seek our own glory and recognition, rather than giving glory to God.

Yet, Jesus calls us to recognize our true identity as children of the Kingdom. We are meant to flourish and bear good fruit like the wheat, remaining rooted in our relationship with God and aligned with His purposes.

To combat the weeds in our lives, we must be vigilant and intentional. We need to be aware of the distractions that may deter us from our faith and commitment to God. By prioritizing daily prayer and seeking God’s guidance, we can overcome these distractions and draw closer to Him.

Living as children of the Kingdom requires a conscious effort to put God and others before ourselves. Instead of delaying acts of kindness, we must seize the opportunities to love and serve our neighbors in the present moment.

Furthermore, we must humble ourselves, recognizing that our true worth and identity come from being God’s beloved children. Seeking our own glory and recognition will only lead to emptiness, while giving glory to God will bring fulfillment and purpose to our lives.

May this reflection prompt us to examine our lives and identify the weeds that hinder our growth in God’s Kingdom. Let us strive to be like the wheat, drawing closer to the Lord each day and aligning our lives with His will. May we resist the distractions and temptations that surround us, and instead, embrace our true identity as children of the Kingdom, seeking to glorify God in all that we do.

Prayer for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Lord, help me to make space in my life for your word to grow in my heart. Teach me to nourish and grow what is from you. Help me to resist any desire to let the weeds of the enemy take hold in me. I cannot do it on my own. I am dependent on your mercy. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Living in Hope Amidst Good and Evil

From Bishop Robert Barron for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time. God’s kingdom, represented by the Church, will always be a mixture of good and evil. The enemy of the Church subtly sows evil amidst the good, making vigilance necessary. However, we must be cautious not to destroy the good while trying to eliminate evil. Instead, we are called to live in hope, knowing that at harvest time, the Master will separate the good from the bad. The Church will remain a community of saints and sinners, and it is in this fallen world that we are called to hold onto hope and trust in God’s final judgment.

USCCB Reflection: Nourishing the Wheat Within

In this USCCB reflection for Tuesday of the 17th week in Ordinary Time, the parable of the wheat and the weeds from Matthew’s Gospel is explored. The reflection emphasizes the importance of nurturing the good wheat within ourselves and others while being aware of the weeds that also exist. Just as the landowner in the parable advises not to uproot the weeds immediately, we are encouraged to reflect on our actions and choices, making an effort to nourish the good within us and extend that nourishment to others, even in challenging situations.

Frequently Asked Questions for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

What date is Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Tuesday July 30, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Tuesday July 30, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Exodus 33:7-11; 34:5b-9, 28: Moses and the Meeting Tent
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Jeremiah 14:17-22: A Lament for the Daughter
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 103: The Lord’s Kindness and Mercy
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2)- Psalm 79: A Prayer for Deliverance
Gospel – Matthew 13:36-43: Wheat and Tares Explained
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Gospel for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time?

The gospel provides insights into the reality of good and evil existing together in the world until the final judgment. The passage also encourages believers to faithfully serve God, knowing that they are His children and will be rewarded for their faithfulness. It reminds us of the importance of living righteous lives and remaining faithful to God’s ways in the midst of a world marked by both good and evil.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What does the Gospel for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:36-43) teach us through the parable of the wheat and weeds?

The parable of the weeds highlights the coexistence of good and evil in the world until the time of judgment. It reminds us that God’s kingdom includes both the righteous and the evildoers, and it is His prerogative to separate them at the appointed time. The parable encourages us to remain steadfast in our faith and righteousness, knowing that God will ultimately bring justice and reward to the righteous.

How can we shine like the sun in God’s kingdom, as mentioned in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:36-43)?

To shine like the sun in God’s kingdom, we should strive to live righteous and virtuous lives, guided by the teachings of Jesus. This includes showing love, compassion, and forgiveness to others, living according to God’s commandments, and actively seeking opportunities to serve and bring God’s light into the world.

What is the significance of Moses pitching the meeting tent outside the camp for consulting the LORD in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 33:7-11; 34:5b-9, 28)?

Moses pitching the meeting tent, also known as the “Tent of Meeting,” outside the camp had a profound symbolic meaning. It represented God’s desire to dwell among His people and have a close relationship with them. The location outside the camp signified that God’s presence was not confined to a specific place but accessible to all His people.

What does the cloud signaling God’s presence indicate in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 33:7-11; 34:5b-9, 28)?

The cloud was a visible manifestation of God’s presence and guidance. It served as a sign of His closeness to the Israelites and was used to guide them on their journey through the wilderness. The cloud was an assurance that God was leading and protecting His people.

How did Moses communicate with God in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 33:7-11; 34:5b-9, 28)?

Moses had a unique and intimate relationship with God. He communicated with God “face to face,” indicating a profound level of intimacy and direct dialogue. This special connection allowed Moses to proclaim God’s merciful and gracious nature and seek God’s favor for the people.

What was the purpose of Moses staying with God for forty days and nights in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 33:7-11; 34:5b-9, 28)?

During this period, Moses received the Ten Commandments from God, written on stone tablets. These commandments formed the foundation of moral and ethical principles for the Israelites and continue to hold great significance in Judeo-Christian tradition.

What is the main theme of the Responsorial Psalm for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 103)?

The main theme of Psalm 103 is the kindness, mercy, and compassion of the Lord. It emphasizes God’s attributes of justice, love, and forgiveness, which surpass our sins. The psalmist calls on the people to fear and walk in the ways of the Lord and, in turn, show kindness to others.

How can we apply the teachings for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 in our daily lives?

These readings remind us of God’s constant presence and desire for a personal relationship with us. We should strive to communicate with God through prayer and seek His guidance in our daily endeavors. The psalmist’s call to show kindness to others and walk in the ways of the Lord reminds us to practice love and compassion in our interactions with fellow human beings. Additionally, the parable of the weeds encourages us to maintain our faith and trust in God’s plan, knowing that justice will prevail in the end.

How does the First Reading for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Jeremiah 14:17-22) relate to our lives today?

The First Reading recounts the sorrowful state of the people facing destruction, hunger, and death. It serves as a reminder that, even in difficult times, we can turn to God in repentance and prayer. It encourages us to acknowledge our sins, seek healing, and trust in God’s mercy and power as the ultimate source of hope and salvation.

What can we learn from the experiences of the people in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Jeremiah 14:17-22)?

The experiences of the people in the First Reading teach us about the consequences of sin and the importance of turning to God in times of difficulty. Their prayerful acknowledgment of their sins and plea for God’s mercy show us the power of repentance and the hope that comes from relying on God’s covenant and love.

What can we learn from the Responsorial Psalm for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 79)?

Psalm 79 is a heartfelt plea for deliverance, forgiveness, and liberation from afflictions and imprisonment. It reminds us that we can turn to God in times of distress, asking for His intervention in our lives and the lives of those who suffer. The psalmist’s expression of thanksgiving and praise demonstrates the importance of gratitude, even amidst challenges.

How can we apply the message of these readings for Tuesday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 to our daily life?

These readings emphasize the importance of prayer, repentance, and seeking God’s mercy and guidance. We can incorporate this into our prayer life by regularly examining our hearts, acknowledging our sins, and asking for God’s forgiveness, especially in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. We can also offer prayers of intercession for those who suffer, seeking God’s deliverance and healing for them.

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