* As an Amazon affiliate, this site earns from qualifying purchases.

Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years. When this falls on July 29, the gospel for the Memorial of Saints Martha, Mary, and Lazarus is used.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Exodus 40:16-21, 34-38: Moses completes the construction of the tabernacle. The cloud of the Lord covers the tabernacle, indicating God’s presence, and whenever the cloud lifted, the Israelites would continue their journey, following it as a guide throughout their travels in the wilderness.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Jeremiah 18:1-6: The prophet Jeremiah receives a message from the Lord to visit the potter’s house. There, he witnesses the potter shaping clay on the wheel and learns that just as the potter has power over the clay, so does God have power over nations and individuals, to shape and reshape them according to His will.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 84: Lord, Your dwelling is mighty and beautiful! My soul yearns for Your presence. Blessed are those in Your house, continually praising You. One day with You is worth a thousand elsewhere. How lovely is Your dwelling place, O Lord!
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 146: Blessed is the one who finds help in the God of Jacob. Praise the Lord, O my soul! I will sing praises to my God throughout my life. Do not rely on earthly rulers, for their plans perish with them. Put your hope in the Lord, the Maker of heaven and earth, and all that dwells within.
  • Gospel Matthew 13:47-53: Jesus likened the Kingdom of heaven to a net gathering fish of all kinds, separating good from bad at the end. Those instructed in the Kingdom understand, bringing forth both new and old teachings.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

  • The Parable of the Net: The gospel presents the parable of the net, where the Kingdom of God is likened to a fishing net that gathers all kinds of fish, good and bad.
  • The Gathering and Separation: The parable illustrates the coexistence of the righteous and the wicked within the Kingdom of God until the end of the age when there will be a separation and judgment.
  • The Final Judgment: Jesus emphasizes the certainty of the final judgment, where the angels will separate the righteous from the wicked, similar to the parable of the wheat and the tares.
  • Understanding and Wisdom: Jesus asks the disciples if they understand the parables, highlighting the importance of seeking wisdom and insight to comprehend the spiritual truths conveyed.

Then every scribe who has been instructed in the Kingdom of heaven is like the head of a household who brings from his storeroom both the new and the old.

Thoughts for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

In the parables in the gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53), Jesus uses the images of good and bad fish and new and old treasures to teach valuable lessons about discernment and openness to change. In the sea, there are fish which are good for eating and those which are not. In our closets, we have new things and old things. We must learn to see what is useful in our lives and what is not.

The analogy of the fish in the sea represents the choices we encounter daily. Just as there are fish which are good for eating or not in the sea, we are presented with options that are either beneficial or detrimental to our spiritual growth and well-being. We must develop the ability to discern between what is good and what is not, making choices that align with God’s will and lead us closer to Him.

Similarly, the image of new and old treasures in our closets emphasizes the importance of balance and openness to change. While it is natural to have familiarity and comfort with the old, we should not be afraid to embrace new ideas and experiences that the Lord may present to us. Being receptive to what is new allows the Lord to work in our hearts, inspiring growth and transformation.

As we reflect on these parables, we are encouraged to cultivate discernment and openness in our daily lives. Let us seek God’s guidance in making choices that honor Him and promote goodness in ourselves and others. Additionally, may we be open to the promptings of the Holy Spirit, welcoming new insights and opportunities for growth in our faith journey.

Discernment and openness enable us to distinguish what is useful and edifying from what is harmful and limiting. By following the path of goodness and embracing God’s newness, we foster a deeper relationship with the Lord and experience His transformative power in our lives.

Prayer for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Lord, help me to see what to keep in my life and what needs to go. Let me honor the old which has brought me here to you, but also be open to the new which will help me see where you are leading me. I want to follow you wherever you guide me, even if it is out of my comfort zone. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Embracing the Kingdom’s Mystery

From Bishop Robert Barron for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time. The first parable speaks of the final gathering of all creation at the end of time, emphasizing the need for readiness and alignment with God’s rule. The second parable illustrates the balance between tradition and innovation in the kingdom. Jesus’ ministry builds upon the past while introducing something new and unprecedented through the work of the Holy Spirit. Those learned in the ways of the kingdom appreciate the heritage of faith and remain open to the Spirit’s guidance for new revelations. As we journey in the kingdom, let us be watchful, responsive, and receptive to God’s unfolding plan.

USCCB Reflection: Hidden Treasures in God’s Kingdom

In this USCCB video reflection for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time, the analogy of flea markets and garage sales is used to illustrate the concept of hidden treasures in God’s kingdom. Just as people find valuable items amidst discarded things, Jesus reminds us that the kingdom of God works similarly, picking up both treasure and junk. We are called to recognize our priceless worth as part of God’s artwork and radiate His love and grace in our everyday lives, even in seemingly ordinary surroundings. Embracing our identity as valuable treasures in God’s kingdom can bring light and beauty to the world around us.

USCCB Reflection: Shaped by God

In this USCCB video reflection for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2, the story of Jeremiah at The Potter’s House is highlighted. God’s message to Jeremiah reveals that, like clay in the Potter’s hands, we are subject to God’s will in our lives. While we have the freedom to make plans, we are called to seek and accept God’s will, cooperating with Him to live our lives to the fullest. Embracing the teachings of Christ and participating in the grace of the sacraments help us distinguish ourselves as the wheat in God’s Kingdom.

Frequently Asked Questions for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time

What date is Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Thursday August 1, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Thursday August 1, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Exodus 40:16-21, 34-38: The Dwelling and God’s Presence
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Jeremiah 18:1-6: The Potter’s Lesson
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 84: Yearning for God’s Dwelling Place
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 146: Praise the LORD, My Soul
Gospel – Matthew 13:47-53: Parable of the Net
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time?

The gospel tells of the parable of the net, the gathering and separation, the final judgment, understanding, and wisdom. This passage echoes the previous parables in Matthew 13, emphasizing the coexistence of the righteous and the wicked within the Kingdom of God until the final judgment. It encourages believers to seek understanding and wisdom to grasp the spiritual truths contained in Jesus’ teachings.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What does the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53) teach us about the Kingdom of heaven?

The Gospel parable of the net gathering fish emphasizes that the Kingdom of heaven is inclusive, embracing people from all walks of life. At the end, there will be a separation between the righteous and the wicked, just as the good fish are kept and the bad ones are thrown away. This parable reminds us of the final judgment and the importance of living in accordance with God’s teachings.

How does the image of the Kingdom of heaven being like a net in the the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53) inspire us to evangelize and share our faith?

The image of the net gathering fish inspires us to evangelize and share our faith by recognizing that God’s Kingdom is open to all. Just as the net collects fish of different kinds, the Gospel calls us to reach out to people from all backgrounds, cultures, and walks of life. Sharing the love of Christ with others and inviting them to encounter God’s mercy and grace allows more souls to be gathered into the Kingdom.

What is the significance of being “instructed in the Kingdom” in understanding and sharing new and old teachings in the the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53)?

Being “instructed in the Kingdom” refers to a deep understanding of God’s truths and teachings. This enables believers to draw from the rich heritage of the Church’s teachings (the “old”) while also being receptive to the guidance of the Holy Spirit in discerning new insights and applications of the faith (the “new”). It emphasizes the importance of integrating timeless truths with contemporary contexts, enriching the spiritual growth of believers.

What is the significance of the scribe being compared to the head of a household in the he the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53)?

The comparison of the scribe to the head of a household illustrates their role as spiritual leaders and custodians of divine wisdom. Like a head of a household who carefully manages and distributes resources from his storeroom to meet the family’s needs, these instructed scribes responsibly share both the “new” and “old” teachings of the Kingdom of heaven. This implies that they provide nourishment and guidance for others, ensuring that the treasures of both traditional and fresh spiritual insights are passed on to enrich the lives of those they teach. It highlights their responsibility to foster spiritual growth and understanding among God’s people.

What is the significance of bringing both the “new and the old” from the storeroom in the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53)?

By including both the “old and the new,” the scribes demonstrate the importance of preserving and honoring the rich heritage of their faith while remaining open to the guidance of the Holy Spirit, leading to fresh revelations and applications of God’s truths. This approach fosters a balanced and holistic understanding of the Kingdom of heaven, ensuring that the essential foundations of faith remain intact while adapting to the evolving needs of God’s people. The combination of the “new and the old” enables believers to grow spiritually and navigate the complexities of life with a deeper understanding of God’s timeless and relevant truths.

How can we bring forth both new and old teachings in our witness to the Kingdom of heaven as mentioned in the Gospel for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 13:47-53)?

As believers, we can bring forth both new and old teachings by first deepening our knowledge of Scripture and the Church’s teachings. We should seek guidance from spiritual mentors, participate in faith formation programs, and stay open to the promptings of the Holy Spirit. By understanding the core principles of the faith (the “old”) and applying them to address modern challenges (the “new”), we can effectively witness to the transformative power of the Kingdom of heaven in our lives and the lives of others.

What is the significance of the cloud covering the tabernacle in the First Reading for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 40:16-21, 34-38)?

The cloud covering the tabernacle symbolizes God’s presence and guidance among the Israelites. It served as a visible sign of God’s companionship and protection throughout their journey in the wilderness. When the cloud lifted, it signaled the time for the Israelites to continue their journey, following God’s guidance.

How can we experience God’s presence and guidance in our lives today, similar to the Israelites in the wilderness in the First Reading for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 40:16-21, 34-38)??

We can experience God’s presence and guidance by seeking a personal relationship with Him through prayer, Scripture reading, and participation in the sacraments. Just as the Israelites followed the cloud, we should follow God’s will, allowing Him to lead and guide us on our life’s journey.

What does the Responsorial Psalm for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 84) teach us about yearning for God’s presence?

Psalm 84 expresses a deep longing and yearning for God’s dwelling place. It reminds us that our souls find true fulfillment and happiness in God’s presence. The psalmist portrays the joy and blessedness of being in God’s house, where we can continually praise Him and experience His goodness and love.

How can we continually praise God in our daily lives, as mentioned in the Responsorial Psalm for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 84)?

We can continually praise God by cultivating a spirit of gratitude and worship in our hearts. This can be expressed through regular prayer, participating in Mass and other liturgical celebrations, singing hymns of praise, and offering thanksgiving for the blessings we receive each day. Living a life aligned with God’s commandments and being witnesses of His love and mercy also becomes a form of continuous praise.

How can the themes from the readings for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 deepen our love for God and commitment to living as His disciples?

The themes from these readings remind us of God’s constant presence and guidance in our lives, prompting us to deepen our love and commitment to Him. By seeking His dwelling place and continually praising Him, we grow in our relationship with God. Embracing the teachings of the Kingdom and sharing our faith inspire us to be true disciples of Christ, living out His message of love, compassion, and reconciliation in the world.

What is the significance of the imagery of the potter and clay in the First Reading for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Jeremiah 18:1-6)?

The imagery of the potter and clay illustrates God’s sovereignty and creative power over His creation, including nations and individuals. Just as a potter molds and shapes clay on a wheel, God has the authority to shape and reshape our lives according to His divine will. This imagery reminds us of God’s loving involvement in our lives, guiding us towards our true purpose and potential.

How can we apply the message of the potter and clay in the First Reading for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Jeremiah 18:1-6) to our personal lives and spiritual journey?

The message of the potter and clay encourages us to embrace God’s guidance and surrender to His loving hands. We should allow Him to mold us, recognizing that His plans for us are greater than our own. It also reminds us to remain pliable and receptive to His will, trusting that His shaping will lead us to a life of fulfillment and holiness.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 146) inspire us to put our hope in the Lord rather than earthly rulers?

Psalm 146 reminds us of the limitations of earthly rulers and their plans, which are temporary and perish with them. In contrast, the Psalmist urges us to place our hope in the Lord, who is the eternal Maker of heaven and earth. Trusting in God allows us to find lasting help and guidance, knowing that He is always faithful and reliable.

How can we praise and sing to God throughout our lives, as mentioned in the Responsorial Psalm for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 146)?

Praising and singing to God throughout our lives involves developing a habit of gratitude and worship. We can do this through daily prayers of thanksgiving, participating actively in Mass, and singing hymns of praise. Embracing a spirit of thankfulness and recognizing God’s goodness in all aspects of our lives allows us to continually offer our praises to Him.

How can the readings for Thursday of the 17th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 inspire us to trust in God’s guidance for our lives?

Today’s readings inspire us to trust in God’s guidance by reminding us of His creative power, His sovereignty over all things, and His inclusive invitation to His Kingdom. Recognizing God as the ultimate potter of our lives and trusting in His wisdom allows us to navigate challenges and uncertainties with confidence. Moreover, putting our hope in God rather than earthly rulers or possessions ensures that our lives are anchored in the eternal and unchanging love of our Creator.

Join our email list to receive weekly emails with Catholic reflections and more.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Young Catholics