* As an Amazon affiliate, this site earns from qualifying purchases.

Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Judges 6:11-24a: An angel of the Lord appears to Gideon. The angel commissions Gideon to deliver Israel from their oppression, reassuring him of God’s presence and power through a miraculous sign involving a consumed meal and a burning fire.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ezekiel 28:1-10: A prophecy is made against the king of Tyre, condemning his pride and arrogance. The king mistakenly believes in his divinity and wisdom, ultimately foretelling his downfall and the judgment that will befall him.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 85: God proclaims peace to His people, showing kindness, truth, justice, and salvation. His benefits will be given, and the land will flourish under His just guidance.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Deuteronomy 32: God, who deals both life and death, refrains from destroying His people due to concern for the pride and boasting of their enemies. Their lack of reason and understanding leads them to wrongly attribute their victories to their own strength, unaware that it is God who allows their successes and will bring justice and pity upon His servants.
  • Gospel Matthew 19:23-30: Jesus teaches his disciples about the difficulty for the rich to enter the kingdom of heaven, using the metaphor of a camel passing through the eye of a needle. He emphasizes that with God, all things are possible, and promises that those who have left everything to follow him will receive eternal rewards in the kingdom.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Wealth and the Kingdom: Jesus’ analogy of a rich man entering the kingdom of heaven highlights the theme of the challenge that wealth can pose to spiritual growth. This emphasizes the need to recognize the potential pitfalls of material prosperity.
  • Relying on God: Jesus’ statement that “with God all things are possible” underscores the theme of relying on God’s intervention and the power of His grace. This highlights the idea that God’s influence can overcome human limitations.
  • Sacrifice and Reward: The concept of leaving behind wealth and possessions for the sake of the kingdom introduces the theme of sacrifice and its connection to eternal rewards. This emphasizes the idea that self-denial for Christ’s sake yields greater spiritual treasures.
  • Reversal of Expectations: Jesus’ teaching about the first being last and the last being first challenges conventional societal norms. This theme emphasizes the nature of God’s kingdom and its reversal of worldly values.
  • Eternal Inheritance: The promise of receiving “a hundred times as much” in the age to come reinforces the theme of God’s abundant blessings and rewards for those who prioritize the kingdom.
  • Renewed Perspective: The passage encourages a shift in perspective from earthly gain to heavenly treasures. This theme underscores the need to align one’s priorities with God’s eternal plan.

Amen, I say to you, it will be hard for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of heaven. Again I say to you, it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.

Matthew 19:23-24

Thoughts for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time, Jesus tries to explain how difficult it is for us to save ourselves! It is impossible. So who can be saved? Only those who rely on God.

The imagery of a camel passing through the eye of a needle is both striking and memorable. It’s a lesson on how earthly wealth can be an obstacle in our spiritual journey. But it’s not a rejection of wealth itself; rather, a warning about letting it govern our lives. For Catholics, it’s an important reminder to prioritize faith and spiritual wealth over material possessions.

In response to the disciples’ astonishment, Jesus reassures that while human effort may seem futile, with God, all is possible. This emphasizes that our salvation doesn’t solely depend on our actions, but on God’s grace. It’s a comforting thought that God’s mercy is always there, ready to guide and help us.

The promise of eternal rewards for sacrifices made in following Jesus is an acknowledgment that the path may not be easy. However, the struggles and sacrifices are not forgotten by God. This teaches us that our efforts have meaning, and the rewards are beyond anything we can imagine here on earth.

The notion that the last shall be first and the first shall be last is a reminder to live humbly. Success in God’s Kingdom doesn’t depend on earthly status or achievements. This call to humility and service to others helps us focus on what truly matters and aligns us with God’s values.

Lastly, this passage encourages us to approach life with an eternal perspective. Recognizing that our choices now have lasting impact, and that our ultimate goal should be a relationship with Christ, is a guiding principle. The challenges and inspirations from this teaching continue to resonate, urging us towards a deeper commitment and trust in God’s plan.

Prayer for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time

Lord, keep pulling me close to you. Teach me to let go of the things which are obstacles to becoming closer to you. Only you can save me. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Relying on God’s Possibilities

In this Gospel reflection for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron discusses Jesus’ teaching that it’s hard for the rich to enter the Kingdom of heaven, emphasizing that with God, all things are possible. Barron reminds us that when we fail in our spiritual journey, we must become beggars, relying on God rather than ourselves. He shares Thérèse of Lisieux’s imagery of being a helpless child, needing to be carried by the heavenly Father. This reflection conveys the message that human efforts alone are not enough, but with God’s grace, even the making of saints becomes possible.

USCCB Reflection: What’s in Your Wallet?

This reflection for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time focuses on what truly drives our lives, drawing an analogy to the contents of our wallets. It starts with the observation that one in ten verses in the gospel is about the just use of money. While people may not be addicted to money itself, they might be addicted to what money can buy, like popularity or athleticism. Jesus asks us to consider what’s at the heart of our desires. The message emphasizes that with love of God and neighbor at the center of our lives, all things are possible.

Word On Fire: Detachment and Seeing Beauty in Reality

In this Gospel reflection for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron discusses the difficulty of a rich person entering the kingdom of heaven, defining richness not just as wealth but as a mindset. He explains that this mindset seeks joy in possessions and ego, contrasting it with Jesus’ teaching that surrendering worldly attachments leads to eternal life. Barron emphasizes that Jesus’ promise is not a mere capitalist calculation but a spiritual truth. When you let go of worldly possessions in a spirit of detachment, you begin to see them as beautiful realities rather than objects of manipulation or possession.

USCCB Reflection: Love Over Riches

This reflection for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time explores Jesus’ teaching from Matthew’s gospel, highlighting the difficulty for a rich person to enter heaven. It emphasizes that the love of God should be at the center of life, surpassing all earthly attachments. A personal anecdote illustrates that selling a cherished car to help others was more fulfilling because love for family and God outweighed the love for material possessions. The central message encourages loving God more than anything else and being willing to prioritize that love in our actions and decisions.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Tuesday August 20, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Tuesday August 20, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Judges 6:11-24a: Commissioning of Gideon: A Call to Deliverance
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ezekiel 28:1-10: Pride and Judgment: Prophecy against the King of Tyre
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 85: Divine Proclamation of Peace and Salvation
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Deuteronomy 32: The Song of Moses: Divine Justice and Covenant Faithfulness
Gospel – Matthew 19:23-30: The Challenge of Wealth and the Promise of Eternal Rewards
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time?

In the gospel, Matthew 19:23-30, we find themes related to wealth’s potential challenges to spiritual growth, relying on God’s intervention and grace, the relationship between sacrifice and reward, the reversal of societal expectations, the promise of an eternal inheritance, and the call to adopt a renewed heavenly perspective. This passage invites us to consider the implications of our choices and priorities in light of God’s kingdom.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What does Jesus mean by the metaphor of a camel passing through the eye of a needle in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:23-30)?

Jesus uses this metaphor to illustrate the difficulty the rich may have in entering the kingdom of heaven. It warns against the attachment to wealth and material possessions. Their attachment to wealth can be an obstacle to spiritual growth.

How does Jesus answer the disciples’ concerns about who can be saved in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:23-30)?

Jesus reassures the disciples that, with God, all things are possible. Though human efforts may fall short, God’s grace can overcome any obstacle.

What promise does Jesus make to those who follow him in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:23-30)?

Jesus promises that those who have left everything to follow Him will receive eternal rewards in the kingdom, emphasizing the value of spiritual commitment over worldly possessions.

How does the promise of eternal rewards in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:23-30) relate to humility?

Jesus’ promise highlights the contrast between earthly wealth and spiritual riches. Those who humbly follow Jesus, forsaking worldly possessions, will gain eternal rewards in the kingdom.

Who is Gideon, and what is he commissioned to do in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Judges 6:11-24a)?

Gideon is chosen by an angel of the Lord to deliver Israel from oppression. The angel reassures Gideon of God’s presence and gives a miraculous sign involving a consumed meal and burning fire.

What does the miraculous sign signify in the context of the First Reading for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Judges 6:11-24a)?

The sign signifies God’s approval of Gideon’s mission and His presence and power. It reassures Gideon that he is indeed chosen for this task.

What themes are highlighted in the Responsorial Psalm for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 85)?

Psalm 85 emphasizes God’s peace, kindness, truth, justice, and salvation. It expresses hope for God’s benefits and flourishing under His just guidance.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 85) connect with the First Reading (Judges 6:11-24a)?

Both the reading and the Psalm emphasize God’s guidance and care. In Judges, God’s guidance is specific to Gideon, while the Psalm extends God’s kindness and justice to all His people.

What unifying theme or lesson can be drawn from the readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The readings stress the importance of trusting in God’s guidance and power, emphasizing the challenges and rewards of spiritual commitment. They collectively teach about faithfulness, obedience, and the tension between worldly attachments and spiritual values. Whether it’s Gideon’s calling or Jesus’ teachings about wealth, the message is clear: following God’s will leads to blessings and salvation, while material attachments can become hindrances.

What is the prophecy against the king of Tyre about in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ezekiel 28:1-10)?

The prophecy condemns the king’s pride and arrogance. He mistakenly believes in his divinity and wisdom, which leads to his predicted downfall and judgment.

What can we learn from the king of Tyre’s mistake in the First Reading for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ezekiel 28:1-10)?

The king’s belief in his divinity illustrates the dangers of pride and self-reliance. Acknowledging God’s sovereignty and our dependence on Him is essential to avoid such pitfalls.

What message does the Responsorial Psalm for the First Reading for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Deuteronomy 32) convey about human achievements and victories?

The Psalm reminds us that victories and successes are not solely our own doing. God’s hand plays a role, and attributing success solely to human strength is a grave

How does the Responsorial Psalm for the First Reading for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Deuteronomy 32) connect with the First Reading (Deuteronomy 32)?

Both passages emphasize the dangers of pride and the importance of recognizing God’s role in our lives. While the First Reading condemns a specific individual’s arrogance, the Psalm extends the warning to all people.

What overarching lesson is conveyed through the readings for Tuesday of the 20th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The readings collectively warn against pride and self-reliance while encouraging trust in God’s wisdom and grace. Whether it’s the king of Tyre’s downfall, the lesson of attributing successes to God in the Psalm, or Jesus’ teachings on wealth, they all guide us towards humility, recognition of God’s sovereignty, and the pursuit of spiritual over material riches.

Join our email list to receive weekly emails with Catholic reflections and more.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Young Catholics