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Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 1:1-7: I, Paul, am a servant of Jesus, designated to spread God’s Gospel. This Gospel, long foretold, is about Jesus, the resurrected Son of God. My mission is to cultivate faith among the Gentiles, including you in Rome.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Galatians 4:22-24, 26-27, 31–5:1: Abraham had two sons, one from a slave, another from a free woman. These represent two covenants: one of slavery from Mount Sinai, and one of freedom from Jerusalem above. We are children of the free woman, so stand firm in Christ’s freedom.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 98: The Lord has performed wondrous deeds, revealing his salvation and justice to all nations. He remains faithful to Israel, and his salvation is visible to the whole earth. Sing praise.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 113: Servants of the Lord praise His name eternally, from sunrise to sunset. The Lord’s glory is above all nations and heavens. He uplifts the poor and lowly.
  • Gospel Luke 11:29-32: Jesus tells the crowd that their generation is evil for seeking a sign. He states that the only sign given will be similar to Jonah’s experience. At the judgment, this generation will be condemned by the queen of the south and the men of Nineveh.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Demand for Signs: The crowd seeks a sign, but Jesus denies their request. This theme underscores skepticism and the constant demand for miracles as proof.
  • Jonah’s Significance: Jesus refers to the sign of Jonah as the only sign given to that generation. This theme emphasizes repentance and the universal call to turn towards God.
  • Greater than Solomon/Jonah: Jesus declares that someone greater than Solomon or Jonah is present. This theme emphasizes Jesus’ unique significance and authority.
  • Judgment by Comparison: Jesus states that the Queen of the South and the people of Nineveh will rise in judgment against that generation. This introduces the theme of relative morality and accountability.

This generation is an evil generation; it seeks a sign, but no sign will be given it, except the sign of Jonah.

Luke 11:29

Thoughts for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, Luke 11:29-32, Jesus admonishes the people for asking for signs. They are seeking miracles, not a closer relationship with God.

This passage highlights Jesus’s frustration with the crowd. He refers to the story of Jonah as a metaphor, stating that something greater than Jonah or Solomon is present. The Queen of the South and the Ninevites are presented as examples of people who recognized the signs and repented.

In today’s culture, we often seek tangible evidence before we believe or commit to something. This can translate into our spiritual lives as well. Just like the crowd, we may find ourselves looking for explicit signs from God, forgetting that the most substantial evidence often lies in everyday experiences and wisdom.

The essence of Jonah’s story wasn’t just the whale but his message of repentance that transformed Nineveh. It’s a lesson in listening and changing one’s ways when confronted with truth. Similarly, we encounter truths in our lives that call for a change of heart.

How often do I want God to just fix the problems in my life? And when the crisis is over, I go back to doing what I was before. I want signs and wonders, but I do not want to really be transformed. I want the quick fix instead of the long hard work of repentance. The true sign we seek is God’s mercy.

Jesus indicates that He is a greater sign than Jonah or Solomon. While these figures were pivotal in their own rights, the message and salvation offered through Jesus are of an altogether different magnitude. Sometimes, the answers or signs we seek are right in front of us, in the teachings and examples set by Jesus.

Luke 11:29-32 reminds us to not get lost in seeking extraordinary signs or wonders to validate our faith. Sometimes, the sign is the message itself and how it resonates with us. Whether it’s a lesson from Sunday Mass or an insight gained during prayer, let’s focus on recognizing the everyday ‘signs’ that guide us closer to God.

Prayer for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Lord, grant me a steadfast spirit to truly seek you. May I see that the real miracle in my life is your boundless love for me. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Signs of Repentance

In this reflection for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron discusses Jesus’ message about the sign of Jonah, likening the ancient city of Nineveh to modern cities engrossed in worldly concerns. According to Bishop Barron, Nineveh’s conversion serves as a model for contemporary society, showcasing a return to God as the ultimate good. He emphasizes that the ascetic practices of fasting and sackcloth adopted by the Ninevites are aimed at detaching people from worldly pleasures. Bishop Barron suggests that living with a focus on spiritual over material values is akin to living in the kingdom of God.

USCCB Reflection: The Real Sign

This USCCB video reflection for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time focuses on the idea that Jesus is the “real sign” pointing to greater truths like love, hope, and faith. It warns against modern “slavery” to technology, like cell phones and social media, which can distract us from recognizing these deeper messages. Symbols like crosses and rosaries are emphasized as tools that should guide us toward a better understanding of faith, rather than becoming the main focus themselves. The discussion urges people to seek “real signs” of spirituality in their lives, beyond mere symbols or distractions.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Monday October 14, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Monday October 13, 2025 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 1:1-7: Paul’s Mission
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 98: The Lord’s Salvation
Gospel – Luke 11:29-32: Sign of Jonah

What are the Mass readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The Mass readings for Monday October 14, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Galatians 4:22-24, 26-27, 31–5:1: Two Covenants
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 113: Bless the Lord
Gospel – Luke 11:29-32: Sign of Jonah

What happens in Luke 11:29-32, the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

In this passage, Jesus notes that the crowd is seeking a sign from Him. He declares that no sign will be given except the sign of Jonah. He adds that the people of Nineveh repented at Jonah’s preaching, and the Queen of Sheba sought Solomon’s wisdom. Jesus concludes by saying that something greater than both Jonah and Solomon is among them.

What are the themes for the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The key themes for Luke 11:29-32 include the demand for signs, the importance of repentance, and the greater revelation present in Jesus as compared to previous prophetic figures like Jonah and Solomon.

Why does Jesus describe the generation as “evil” in the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:29-32)?

Jesus is frustrated with the people’s lack of faith, criticizing them for seeking a miraculous sign as a condition for belief.

What does Jesus mean by referring to Jonah and the judgment” in the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:29-32)?

Jesus suggests that, like Jonah’s experience acted as a sign for Nineveh, his own life and teachings should serve as a sign for the people. At judgment, their lack of faith will be condemned by more faithful figures like the queen of the south and the men of Nineveh.

What is the significance of the reference to Jonah, the queen of the south, and the men of Nineveh in the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:29-32)?

These figures from biblical history accepted God’s message with less evidence than was provided to Jesus’ audience. They serve as a condemnation to those who fail to recognize Jesus despite clearer signs.

Why does Jesus mention Jonah and Solomon in the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:29-32)?

Jonah’s story is a sign of repentance and divine mercy, while Solomon’s story embodies divine wisdom. Jesus mentions them to indicate that His own ministry surpasses these significant Old Testament figures in both wisdom and impact.

What does Jesus mean by “something greater” in the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:29-32)?

Jesus is pointing to Himself as the ultimate revelation of God’s wisdom and mercy. He’s signaling that if people recognized the wisdom in Solomon and the call to repentance in Jonah, they should be even more attuned to what He is offering.

How can the gospel for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:29-32) be applied to everyday life?

The passage suggests that focusing solely on miraculous signs may cause us to miss the bigger picture: the teachings and transformative potential that Jesus offers. It also underscores the need for openness to wisdom and repentance as qualities that should be sought in life. Finally, it reminds us that Jesus’ teachings are the ultimate guide, surpassing all previous revelations.

What is Paul’s role as stated in the first reading for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 1:1-7)?

Paul identifies himself as a servant of Jesus, appointed to spread God’s Gospel. His primary mission is to cultivate faith among the Gentiles.

What is unique about the Gospel Paul is preaching in the first reading for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 1:1-7)?

This Gospel is not new but was long foretold. It centers around Jesus, who is identified as the resurrected Son of God, confirming the continuity of the Christian message with Jewish prophecies.

How is the LORD’s salvation depicted in the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 98)?

The LORD’s salvation is described as universal, visible not just to Israel but to all nations. It is an expression of His justice and wondrous deeds.

What does the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 98) indicate about God’s faithfulness?

The Psalm emphasizes that God remains faithful to Israel while also extending His salvation and justice to all nations, underscoring His universal reach and steadfast commitment.

What common theme can be observed in these readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

A recurring theme is the universal scope of God’s message and salvation, aimed not just at Israel but at the Gentiles and all nations, demanding a universal response to God’s revelations.

How do these readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 challenge us today?

They prompt us to be receptive to God’s message and to act on it. Whether it’s accepting the Gospel, like Paul, praising God’s deeds, like the Psalmist, or acknowledging Jesus’ divinity without demanding additional signs, active faith is encouraged.

What is the significance of Abraham’s two sons in the first reading for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Galatians 4:22-24, 26-27, 31–5:1)?

Paul uses the story of Abraham’s sons to illustrate the two covenants: one of slavery, tied to Mount Sinai, and the other of freedom, linked to the “Jerusalem above.” The sons symbolize these contrasting states of being.

What is Paul urging the Galatians to do in the first reading for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Galatians 4:22-24, 26-27, 31–5:1)?

Paul is telling the Galatians to stand firm in the freedom that comes through faith in Christ, signifying that they are children of the free woman (or the covenant of freedom).

What is the key message in the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 113)?

The psalm encourages the faithful to praise the Lord’s name at all times, highlighting His glory and benevolence, particularly toward the downtrodden.

How does the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 113) describe the Lord’s interaction with the poor and lowly?

The psalm states that the Lord uplifts the poor and lowly, showcasing His commitment to social justice and equity.

What do these readings for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 say about freedom and servitude?

Galatians emphasizes spiritual freedom through faith, while the psalm praises God for uplifting the downtrodden. Luke warns against the bondage of disbelief. Together, they suggest that true freedom comes from faith and obedience to God.

How can these messages for Monday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 be applied in contemporary life?

The readings remind us to appreciate and utilize the freedom that faith provides. They encourage us to live in a way that honors God’s teachings, making choices that reflect this freedom rather than actions that lead to spiritual enslavement.

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