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Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 2:1-11: If you judge others while doing the same wrongs, you won’t escape God’s judgment. God’s kindness should lead to repentance; ignoring this stores up wrath for you.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Galatians 5:18-25: If you’re guided by the Spirit, you’re not subject to the law. Works of the flesh lead away from God’s Kingdom, while the Spirit’s fruits bring you closer. Live and follow the Spirit.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 62: My soul finds rest in God alone, who is my rock and salvation. I won’t be disturbed, for my hope comes from Him. Trust in God, He is our refuge.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 1: The man who avoids wickedness and delights in God’s law is blessed. He’s like a flourishing tree, while the wicked are like wind-blown chaff. God watches over the just.
  • Gospel Luke 11:42-46: The Lord criticizes Pharisees for neglecting justice and love while focusing on minor rituals. They seek social honors but ignore true virtues. Scholars of the law also receive rebuke for burdening others without helping.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Selective Obedience: Jesus criticizes the Pharisees for tithing herbs but neglecting justice and love. This theme highlights the inadequacy of adhering to minor laws while ignoring major ethical responsibilities.
  • Burdens on Others: Jesus condemns the experts in law for imposing heavy burdens on people without lifting a finger to help. This theme focuses on the imbalance of imposing strictures while providing no assistance or relief.
  • Hypocrisy and Show: Jesus notes how the Pharisees love public greetings and the best seats in synagogues. This theme exposes the desire for external validation over genuine righteousness.

You impose on people burdens hard to carry, but you yourselves do not lift one finger to touch them.

Luke 11:46

Thoughts for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th week in Ordinary Time, Luke 11:42-46, Jesus admonishes the Pharisees and scholars for their lack of compassion. They used the law to make themselves feel superior and to make it difficult for others to encounter the love of God.

In this passage, Jesus criticizes the Pharisees and experts in the law for their hypocrisy. They are chastised for tithing on minor herbs but neglecting justice and the love of God, and for placing heavy burdens on people without lifting a finger to help.

The Pharisees are so focused on the letter of the law that they miss its spirit. This could be comparable to a modern fixation on rules or procedures at the expense of larger ethical concerns. It serves as a warning against becoming so bogged down in details that we miss the bigger picture.

Tithing on herbs but neglecting justice and love of God is a call-out that holds true today. Sometimes, we might go through the motions of faith or social responsibility without engaging in its deeper aspects like fairness, compassion, or genuine respect for others.

The experts in the law are criticized for not lightening the load of the people but making it heavier. And in the process, they feel like they are better than those around them. In any leadership position, there’s a responsibility to assist rather than merely dictate, to serve as a guide rather than a taskmaster.

I can think of the time in my life when I have felt superior to others because of my own religious observances. I pray and go to Mass on Sunday. I do works of charity. I fast during Lent. I need to work to make sure these practices bring me closer to God and other people or if they make me feel proud of myself.

Luke 11:42-46 serves as a good reminder to balance our attention between the small details and the larger ethical implications of our actions. Whether in religious practice, work, or social interactions, let’s aim to make choices that are not just technically correct but also morally sound.

Prayer

Lord, show me how to walk with others in a spirit of accompaniment. May I never use your love to make others feel inferior or unwelcome. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Sharing Burdens in Faith

In this reflection for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron focuses on Jesus’ critique of scholars of the law who impose difficult burdens on people without helping to ease those burdens. Bishop Barron notes that the essence of Jesus’ teaching is the importance of sharing others’ burdens, particularly in the moral and spiritual realms. This idea encourages self-reflection on moments when one felt healed or accepted by Christ through the Church, highlighting the importance of community and support in the Christian life.

USCCB Reflection: The Call to Kindness and Understanding

This USCCB video reflection for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time focuses on the message of not judging others and instead living as “missionary disciples” of Jesus. The idea is to lead a life full of kindness, mercy, and charity, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus. The speech also references Pope Francis, who encourages everyone to live a Christian life in this manner. The goal is to share God’s love and be kind, even to those we might want to judge. It asks people to be better in how they think, act, and judge others.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Wednesday October 16, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Wednesday October 15, 2025 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 2:1-11: No Escape from Judgment
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 62: Trust in God
Gospel – Luke 11:42-46: Woes to Pharisees

What are the Mass readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The Mass readings for Wednesday October 16, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Galatians 5:18-25: Guided by the Spirit
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 1: Blessed and Wicked
Gospel – Luke 11:42-46: Woes to Pharisees

What happens in Luke 11:42-46, the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

Jesus calls out the Pharisees and legal experts for their hypocrisy. He criticizes the Pharisees for meticulously tithing but neglecting justice and love. He also slams the legal experts for burdening people with hard-to-follow rules while not lifting a finger to help them.

What are the themes for the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The main themes in Luke 11:42-46 include the criticism of religious hypocrisy, the importance of inner virtues over external rituals, and the unfair burden that religious legalism can place on people.

What are the Pharisees criticized for in the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:42-46)?

The Pharisees are criticized for focusing on minor rituals while neglecting bigger issues like justice and love. They’re more concerned with social honors than with true virtues.

Why does Jesus focus on tithing, justice, and love in the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:42-46)?

Jesus points out the incongruity between diligently following certain religious rules like tithing, while ignoring broader, more important moral and ethical imperatives such as justice and love. He’s highlighting a lack of balance and misplaced priorities.

What does Jesus mean by saying the legal experts burden people in the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:42-46)?

Jesus criticizes the experts for making religious practice cumbersome and difficult for ordinary people. They impose many rules but do nothing to help people carry those burdens.

How can the gospel for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time be applied to everyday life?

Luke 11:42-46 encourages us to examine our own priorities. Are we focused on superficial acts of piety while neglecting broader ethical concerns? It also cautions against making life difficult for others by imposing rigid standards that we ourselves are not willing to help carry. Overall, it urges a focus on inner virtues and a balanced moral life.

What warning does Paul give about judging others in the first reading for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 2:1-11)?

Paul warns that if you judge others while committing the same wrongs, you’re not going to escape God’s judgment. The focus is on self-examination and personal responsibility.

What does Paul say about God’s kindness in the first reading for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 2:1-11)?

Paul argues that God’s kindness should lead people to repentance. Ignoring this kindness and continuing in wrongdoing will lead to divine wrath.

Where does the psalmist find rest in the responsorial psalm for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 62)?

The psalmist finds rest in God alone, who serves as his rock and source of salvation. His hope and trust are placed entirely in God.

What is the advice given in the responsorial psalm for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Psalm 62 advises placing trust in God, as He is the ultimate refuge and source of hope and stability.

What do these readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 tell us about hypocrisy?

All readings caution against hypocrisy, whether it’s judging others while doing the same wrongs, or observing rituals but neglecting virtues.

How do the readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 touch upon the theme of divine judgment?

Both Romans and Luke emphasize that wrongful actions and hypocrisy won’t escape God’s judgment. Psalm 62 offers a counterpoint, showing that trust in God offers a refuge from the perils of such judgment.

What is the relationship between the Spirit and the law according to the first reading for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Galatians 5:18-25)?

Paul suggests that if you’re guided by the Spirit, you’re not under the law. The Spirit’s guidance leads to behavior that naturally aligns with God’s intentions, making the law redundant.

What does Paul say are the fruits of the Spirit in the first reading for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Galatians 5:18-25)?

The fruits of the Spirit bring you closer to God’s Kingdom. These include qualities like love, joy, peace, patience, and self-control, among others.

How is the righteous man described in the responsorial psalm for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm1)?

The righteous man avoids wickedness and delights in God’s law. He’s compared to a flourishing tree, in contrast to the wicked who are like chaff scattered by the wind.

What is the ultimate fate of the wicked according to the responsorial psalm for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm1)?

The wicked are likened to chaff, which suggests they will be blown away or separated from the just. God watches over the righteous but does not sustain the wicked.

What’s the overarching message about legalism versus true virtue in the readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

All readings caution against a narrow focus on law and ritual at the expense of deeper virtues. Following the Spirit or delighting in God’s law leads to true righteousness, while mere legalism leads to hypocrisy and estrangement from God.

How can these readings for Wednesday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 apply in a modern context?

These readings challenge us to re-evaluate our own priorities. Are we obsessed with external appearances and rules, or do we focus on cultivating inner virtues and following the Spirit? The call is to align actions with inner faith.

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