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Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 4:1-8: Abraham was saved by his faith in God. Righteousness is credited as a gift through faith, not as a wage for works. David also speaks of the blessedness of such faith.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ephesians 1:11-14: We were chosen and destined by God’s will. In Christ, after hearing and believing the Gospel, we’re sealed with the Holy Spirit as a promise of future redemption. This is for God’s glory.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 32: Blessed is the man whose sins are forgiven by the Lord. By confessing my faults, the guilt of my sin is removed. Rejoice in the Lord for this salvation.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 33: Blessed are those who praise the Lord, for His word is upright and trustworthy. His chosen people receive His kindness and justice, and He watches over all mankind.
  • Gospel Luke 12:1-7: Beware of the Pharisees’ hypocrisy; secrets will be exposed. Don’t fear those who can only harm the body. God notices even the smallest details, like sparrows, and you’re more valuable than they are.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Warning Against Hypocrisy: Jesus advises his disciples to be cautious of the hypocrisy of the Pharisees. This theme points out the dangers of insincere religious practices.
  • Reverence for God: Jesus teaches that reverencing God, who has authority over eternal life, is more important than fearing those who can only harm the body. This theme emphasizes ultimate accountability.
  • Value of Individuals: Jesus states that not even sparrows are forgotten by God, emphasizing the individual worth of every person. This theme reassures that God’s care extends to all.

Are not five sparrows sold for two small coins? Yet not one of them has escaped the notice of God. Even the hairs of your head have all been counted. Do not be afraid. You are worth more than many sparrows.

Luke 12:6-7

Thoughts for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, Luke 12:1-7, Jesus tells us that God cares about us. He knows us intimately, he values us, and we can trust in him.

In this passage, Jesus warns His disciples to be wary of the hypocrisy of the Pharisees and reassures them that nothing hidden will remain concealed. He advises them to fear God rather than people and reminds them of their worth by comparing them to sparrows, which God also cares for.

Hypocrisy can show up in many ways today, from everyday settings to social media. This passage reminds us to maintain integrity, ensuring that our external actions match our internal beliefs. Inconsistencies might not be evident immediately but will eventually be exposed.

In a society that often measures worth through material success or social status, these verses offer a different metric. They remind us that our value isn’t determined by worldly measures but by God’s love for us.

Acknowledging than God knows and values us can provide a sense of security. It means that in our most vulnerable states, we’re not alone or worthless but under a watchful and caring gaze.

When I am anxious, I need to remember that God is close and watching over me. I do not need to fear anything except that which separates me from God. He gave his only son for me. What more evidence do I need that I matter to him?

It’s worth revisiting Luke 12:1-7 whenever feelings of inadequacy or insignificance creep in. Whether facing everyday challenges, social pressures, or internal doubts, remember that worth is not solely determined by these transient situations. We are valued on a much more fundamental level.

Prayer for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Father, you see me and know my needs. When I am anxious, draw me closer to you. I never want to be separated from you. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Facing Fears Through Faith

In this reflection for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron discusses how today’s Gospel tackles our deepest fears, particularly the fear of death. He underscores that the material and physical concerns are insignificant compared to the ultimate goal of life with God. Fearing God, in the context of love and reverence, aligns us with a power that goes beyond earthly limitations. This perspective, rooted in the belief that God knows and guides us intimately, helps mitigate other fears one might have in life.

USCCB Reflection: Between Perfection and Mercy

This USCCB video reflection for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time emphasizes avoiding superficial religious practices and aiming for genuine spiritual growth. It mentions the expectation set by Christ to be as perfect as God and questions how one can meet this high standard. The answer lies in God’s extreme mercy, which can be accessed through genuine repentance and the sacrament of reconciliation. By doing so, individuals can find peace and understand the love and mercy God offers, despite the seemingly unattainable demand for perfection.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Friday October 17, 2025.

What are the Mass readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Friday October 17, 2025 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 4:1-8: Abraham’s Righteousness
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 32: Joy in Forgiveness
Gospel – Luke 12:1-7: Warning Against Hypocrisy

What are the Mass readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The Mass readings for Friday October 16, 2026 are:
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ephesians 1:11-14: Sealed in Christ
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 33: Divine Blessings
Gospel – Luke 12:1-7: Warning Against Hypocrisy

What happens in Luke 12:1-7, the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

Jesus warns his disciples to beware of the hypocrisy of the Pharisees, likening it to yeast that permeates dough. He tells them not to fear those who can harm the body but can’t do more. Instead, fear God, who has control over eternal life. He reassures them by saying even sparrows, sold for a small price, are not forgotten by God, and therefore humans are valued much more.

What are the themes for the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The key themes in Luke 12:1-7 are the danger of hypocrisy, the nature of true fear as reverence for God, and the assurance of God’s care for all, even the seemingly insignificant.

What warning does Jesus give about the Pharisees in the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 12:1-7)?

Jesus warns about the hypocrisy of the Pharisees and adds that secrets will eventually be exposed.

Why does Jesus compare hypocrisy to yeast in the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 12:1-7)?

Yeast spreads through the entire batch of dough, just as hypocrisy can spread and infect an entire community or belief system. It’s a warning about how a little bit of bad behavior or false teaching can have large, pervasive effects.

Why should we not fear those who can only harm the body, as mentioned in the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 12:1-7)?

Jesus emphasizes that earthly harm is temporary, and that it’s more important to focus on the eternal. God should be the focus of our fear, in the sense of awe and respect, because only He has power over the soul.

What does Jesus say about the value of individual lives in the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 12:1-7)?

Jesus highlights that God notices even small details like sparrows. He assures that individuals are more valuable than sparrows, implying God’s careful attention to human lives.

How can the gospel for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time be applied to everyday life?

Luke 12:1-7 calls for a focus on genuine faith and ethics over outward appearances or societal judgment. It also provides comfort by emphasizing God’s care for us, suggesting that if God cares for something as common as a sparrow, He surely cares for human beings. This can serve as a reassurance in times of worry or hardship.

How was Abraham saved according to the first reading for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 4:1-8)?

Abraham was saved by his faith in God. Righteousness is described as a gift credited through faith.

What does David add to this notion of faith in the first reading for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 4:1-8)?

David also talks about the blessedness of receiving righteousness through faith. It is not something earned but rather a gift.

What is the central message of the responsorial psalm for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 32)?

The focus is on the joy of being forgiven. Confessing one’s faults removes guilt and leads to a blessed state.

How does one remove the guilt of sin according to the responsorial psalm for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 32)?

By confessing faults to the Lord, the guilt of sin is removed. It advises to rejoice in the Lord for this gift of salvation.

What do these readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 say about the nature of faith and righteousness?

Both Romans and the Psalm emphasize that faith and righteousness are gifts from God, not earned through merit.

How do the readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 collectively advise on the topic of fear and guilt?

The Psalm suggests confession as a way to remove guilt, while the gospel advises against fearing earthly troubles, assuring us of God’s intimate care.

What does it mean to be “sealed with the Holy Spirit” in the first reading for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ephesians 1:11-14)?

Being sealed with the Holy Spirit signifies a kind of spiritual marking or guarantee. It serves as a promise of future redemption and is a testament to God’s will and glory.

How does one get sealed with the Holy Spirit according to the first reading for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ephesians 1:11-14)?

After hearing and believing the Gospel message about Christ, individuals are sealed with the Holy Spirit. It’s a step that comes after faith.

What are the qualities of the Lord as described in the responsorial psalm for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 33)?

The Lord’s word is described as upright and trustworthy. He shows kindness and justice to His chosen people and watches over all mankind.

Who are the people considered “blessed” in the responsorial psalm for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 33)?

Those who praise the Lord are considered blessed. They are recipients of His kindness and justice.

What common theme do the readings for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 share about God’s attention and intention?

All readings point to a God who is intentional and attentive. Whether it’s being sealed by the Holy Spirit, the trustworthy nature of God’s word, or His attention to minute details, the message is that God is intricately involved in our lives.

How can these readingss for Friday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 inform our daily living?

Understanding that we’re under God’s close watch can inspire us to live authentically and in alignment with His will. It also provides comfort that our worth is recognized by a higher power, further encouraging us to live out our faith responsibly.

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