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Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 12:5-16ab: As members of one body in Christ, we each have different gifts to use diligently and cheerfully for the good of all, guided by sincere love and mutual respect.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Philippians 2:5-11: Christ, though divine, chose humility and obedience, even to death, and was thus exalted by God, that all might acknowledge Him as Lord.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 131: I do not seek grandeur but remain peaceful and content in simplicity, like a child with its mother, placing my hope in the Lord always.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 22: I’ll honor my vows to God, and the humble will celebrate His provision. All nations will acknowledge God’s sovereignty and future generations will learn of His justice.
  • Gospel Luke 14:15-24: Jesus tells a parable of a man whose invited guests make excuses to avoid his dinner, leading him to invite the less fortunate instead. He insists that his feast be full, declaring that the original invitees will not get a taste of his banquet.

Go out to the highways and hedgerows and make people come in that my home may be filled. For, I tell you, none of those men who were invited will taste my dinner.

Luke 14:23-24

Themes for the Gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time

  • Invitation to God’s Kingdom: The parable describes a great banquet to which many are invited, symbolizing the invitation to the Kingdom of God. It highlights the inclusivity of the divine invitation to all people, regardless of their initial standing or occupation.
  • Excuses and Rejection: The invitees make excuses for not attending the banquet, representing the rejection of God’s call by those who are preoccupied with worldly matters. This theme suggests that spiritual opportunities are often missed due to mundane distractions.
  • The Inclusion of the Marginalized: When the invited guests refuse to come, the host commands his servant to bring in the poor and marginalized. This theme points to the reversal of expectations in the spiritual realm, where those often overlooked are welcomed.
  • God’s Grace to the Unlikely: The parable implies that divine grace extends to those who might seem undeserving or unlikely in human terms. It suggests that acceptance of God’s invitation is what matters, not social status or prior qualifications.
  • Consequences of Ignoring the Call: The original guests who refuse the invitation face consequences, symbolizing the spiritual peril of ignoring God’s call. This indicates that there are spiritual consequences to the choices made in response to divine invitations.

Thoughts for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time, Luke 14:15-24, Jesus tells the Parable of the Great Banquet, where those invited make excuses for their absence. It challenges us to examine how we prioritize our faith in daily life. Often, we allow mundane tasks and worldly pressures to overshadow our spiritual calling. Yet, when it comes to enticing worldly events, like a sports game or a concert, we rearrange our schedules, showcase our enthusiasm, and make it happen.

This brings to light our selective urgency and asks us to contemplate our true commitments. The Kingdom of God, represented by the wedding feast, should be at the forefront of our lives, surpassing all secular engagements. It’s a call to re-evaluate our excuses and rekindle our zeal for faith, recognizing the ultimate significance of the divine invitation over temporal pleasures. It’s a reminder that God’s invitation is not to be taken lightly—it’s an offer of eternal grace that demands our utmost attention and action.

This parable doesn’t just reveal our misplaced priorities, it also invites us to reflect on God’s generosity and persistence. The host in the story, after being rejected by the first guests, extends the invitation to others. This mirrors how God’s call is inclusive and far-reaching. We’re reminded that the Kingdom of God is open to all, beyond social status or merit.

Understanding this, we’re encouraged not just to accept God’s invitation ourselves, but also to be ambassadors, bringing others to the feast. Our daily actions should reflect this mission, making the path to the feast known and accessible, showing others the joy and fulfillment found in God’s presence. It’s about being part of a community that celebrates and lives out the gospel, not just in word, but in how we live our lives each day.

Prayer

Jesus, help me reorder my priorities. Let me follow your example of wanting nothing except to be close to our Heavenly Father and to do his will. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time

Turning toward the Good

In this reflection from Fr. Richard Rohr, Christianity is seen as more mystical than moralistic, suggesting we’ve focused too much on morality like a chore, and not enough on love and joy. The dualistic mind, which focuses on judgement and division, is criticized for leading to conflict. Positive thoughts, compared to negative ones, don’t stick as easily; one must consciously savor them. This is supported by neuroscience, which shows our brains have a negativity bias. True Christianity, likened to a wedding feast in Luke 14:15, invites all to a space of non-judgment and unity, a stark contrast to the exclusionary practices often observed. The teaching is to love others as oneself, a simple yet challenging command.

The Forty Parables of Jesus

Gerald Lohfink delves into the origins, structures, and the realistic elements that give life to the parables. He focuses on unearthing the original messages embedded within each parable, providing a context that illuminates their significance in the times they were first spoken. This approach not only deepens the understanding of the Parable of the Great Feast but also enriches the reader’s appreciation of Jesus’ teachings as a whole. Lohfink’s detailed and scholarly examination makes this book a valuable resource for anyone looking to gain a deeper understanding of the parables and their enduring wisdom in a Catholic context.

Two-Minute Parables

Each parable is distilled into a concise, easy-to-understand format, making it an ideal choice for family reading sessions. The simplicity of the narrative does not compromise the depth of the messages conveyed, ensuring that readers of all ages can grasp the profound lessons inherent in these biblical tales. The inclusion of the Parable of the Great Feast is particularly notable, as it offers a relatable and clear interpretation of this significant story. This book serves as an excellent resource for families seeking to explore and discuss religious teachings together in a manner that is both enjoyable and enriching.

Frequently Asked Questions about Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time

What date is Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Tuesday November 5, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Tuesday November 4, 2025 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 12:5-16ab: Unity in Diversity
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 131: Contentment in Simplicity
Gospel – Luke 14:15-24: Parable of the Great Dinner

What are the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The Mass readings for Tuesday November 5, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Philippians 2:5-11: Humility in Christ
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 22: Praise and Promise
Gospel – Luke 14:15-24: Parable of the Great Dinner

What is the parable of the Great Banquet about in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

In this parable from Luke 14:15-24, a man prepares a great banquet and invites many guests. When the banquet is ready, those invited make excuses not to attend. The host then extends the invitation to the poor, crippled, blind, and lame. Finally, he insists that his servant bring in anyone who will come so that his house will be full, indicating that those initially invited will not get a taste of his banquet.

What is the main message of the parable of the banquet in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

The main message in Luke 14:15-24 is that the kingdom of God is open to all, especially to those who recognize and seize the opportunity, unlike those who make excuses and therefore miss out.

What excuses do the invitees give for not attending in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

One says he has bought a field and must go see it. Another has purchased five yoke of oxen and wants to try them out. The third has just married and therefore cannot come. These excuses in Luke 14:15-24 represent different preoccupations with material and personal affairs.

How do the excuses in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time reflect human attitudes towards God’s invitation?

The excuses in Luke 14:15-24 symbolize the various ways people prioritize their interests over God’s call, reflecting indifference or a lack of understanding of the importance of God’s offer.

What does the parable symbolize in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

The banquet in Luke 14:15-24 symbolizes the Kingdom of God, and the invitations represent God’s call to humanity. The excuses are metaphors for how people prioritize earthly matters over spiritual ones. The inclusion of the marginalized signifies God’s grace extended to all, especially those often excluded.

Who are represented by the poor and marginalized invited to the banquet in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

In a spiritual sense, these represent those who recognize their need for God’s grace—people who are often marginalized by society but are honored in the Kingdom of God. Luke 14:15-24 reflects a theme of reversal in Jesus’ teachings, where the last become first.

Why are the original guests excluded from the banquet in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

They are excluded not because the host is spiteful, but because they rejected his invitation due to their own choices. It serves as a warning that self-absorption and neglect of spiritual life can lead to missing out on God’s offer of salvation.

What does Jesus imply about who will participate in the kingdom of God in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

in Luke 14:15-24, Jesus implies that those who are humble and responsive, often the less privileged or overlooked by society, will enjoy the feast of the kingdom, unlike the originally invited who reject the invitation.

What lesson can be taken from the excuses made by the invited guests in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time?

Luke 14:15-24 is a warning against complacency and making excuses that prevent us from accepting God’s invitation to the fullness of life with Him.

How can we apply the lesson of this parable in the gospel for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time to our lives?

Luke 14:15-24 encourages us to be responsive to God’s call, to prioritize spiritual values over worldly ones, and to be inclusive and generous in our own lives. It also reminds us to be alert to opportunities to participate in the “banquet” that God offers, through community, service, and worship.

What does Paul mean by saying we are one body in Christ with different gifts in the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

In Romans 12:5-16ab, Paul means that while believers form a single community, each person has unique abilities and functions, and all should work together harmoniously for the community’s benefit.

How should we use our gifts according to the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

According to Romans 12:5-16ab, we should use our gifts diligently and cheerfully, serving others with them in a way that reflects sincere love and devotion to the well-being of the community.

What role does mutual respect play in Paul’s vision for the Christian community in the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Romans 12:5-16ab explains that mutual respect is fundamental; it enables the community to function smoothly, encourages the use of diverse gifts, and fosters a spirit of unity and cooperation.

What is the significance of not seeking grandeur in the responsorial psalm for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The avoidance of grandeur in Psalm 131 signifies a heart that finds fulfillment and contentment in a humble relationship with God rather than in earthly status or achievements.

How does the image of a child with its mother in the responsorial psalm for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 relate to the believer’s trust in God?

This image in Psalm 131 represents complete trust and contentment in God’s provision and care, implying that the believer has a calm and quiet soul in God’s presence.

What does it mean to place one’s hope in the Lord always as mentioned in the responsorial psalm for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

In Psalm 131, placing hope in the Lord means relying on God’s guidance and provision at all times, maintaining faith and trust in His wisdom and timing.

How do the concepts of unity and diversity in the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 complement the Gospel’s theme of inclusion?

The first reading’s emphasis on unity and diverse gifts illustrates how the community of believers should function, which aligns with the Gospel’s theme that the kingdom of God is inclusive and open to all.

What lessons can we draw from these readings for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 about responding to God’s call in our lives?

We can learn to be attentive and responsive to God’s call, using our gifts for the common good and ensuring we do not ignore the invitation to participate in the spiritual life God offers.

What does the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 say about Jesus’ attitude and why is it important?

Philippians 2:5-11 highlights Jesus’ humility and obedience, emphasizing the importance of these virtues as they led to His exaltation by God. It’s important as a model for Christians to follow.

How does Christ’s example influence our interactions with others according to the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

Christ’s example from Philippians 2:5-11 teaches us to approach relationships with humility and selflessness, valuing others’ needs and the community’s well-being over personal ambition or status.

What does it mean for every knee to bow and every tongue to acknowledge Jesus as Lord in the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

This phrase from Philippians 2:5-11 signifies the ultimate recognition of Jesus’ authority and divinity, suggesting that all creation will eventually honor Him.

How does the responsorial psalm for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 connect with the theme of God’s justice and provision?

Psalm 22 connects with these themes by depicting a celebration of God’s provision for the humble and a future where all nations recognize His rule and justice.

What is the significance of honoring vows to God according to the responsorial psalm for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

Honoring vows is a sign of faithfulness and gratitude toward God in Psalm 22, showcasing a believer’s commitment and reverence.

How do the themes of humility, obedience, and exaltation in the first reading for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 relate to the parable of the great banquet?

They relate by suggesting that those who live humbly and obediently, like Jesus, will be honored by God, much like those who accept the invitation to the banquet in the parable.

What does the collective message of these readings for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 convey about the nature of God’s kingdom?

The collective message is that God’s kingdom values humility, service, and responsiveness to God’s call, not social status or earthly success.

In what ways do these readings for Tuesday of the 31st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 challenge us to evaluate our own response to God’s calling?

They challenge us to reflect on whether we live with the humility and obedience of Christ and how we respond to God’s invitations in our daily lives, encouraging us to be ready to accept and act on them.

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