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Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Joshua 24:1-13: Joshua recounts the history of Israel, detailing God’s guidance and miracles that led them out of Egypt and through battles, emphasizing that the Lord provided the land, cities, and harvests.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ezekiel 16:1-15, 60, 63: God describes Jerusalem’s humble origins, its beautification, and subsequent betrayal by turning to harlotry. Despite this, He promises to remember His covenant and offers pardon, though with shame.
  • Alternate First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ezekiel 16:59-63: The LORD pledges to remember the original covenant, create an everlasting one, and grant pardon. He promises to take Jerusalem’s sisters as daughters, leading to shame and acknowledgment of His lordship.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 136: Give thanks to the LORD, for His mercy endures forever; He led His people, smote great kings, slew powerful kings, made their land a heritage, and freed us from our foes.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Isaiah 12: The Lord is my savior and strength, and I will draw joy from the fountain of salvation. Give thanks and proclaim His deeds among the nations. Sing praises, for the Holy One of Israel is great in our midst.
  • GospelMatthew 19:3-12: Pharisees question Jesus about divorce, and He responds by affirming the sacredness of marriage, citing that what God has joined, man must not separate. He explains that Moses allowed divorce due to people’s hard hearts but asserts that divorce leads to adultery, except in unlawful marriages. Jesus concludes by acknowledging that not all can accept this teaching.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Divorce and God’s Design for Marriage: The Pharisees’ question about divorce prompts Jesus to emphasize God’s original intent for marriage. This theme underscores the sanctity and permanence of the marital union.
  • One Flesh Unity: Jesus references the concept of becoming “one flesh” in marriage. This theme highlights the deep bond and unity between spouses, reflecting God’s design for intimate companionship.
  • Moses’ Provision and Hardened Hearts: Jesus explains the allowance for divorce due to the hardness of hearts. This theme addresses the intersection of God’s ideal with human imperfection, revealing His understanding of human limitations.
  • Challenges of Acceptance: The disciples’ reaction to Jesus’ teaching on divorce and celibacy illustrates the theme of the challenges posed by counter-cultural teachings. This theme highlights the struggle to fully comprehend and embrace God’s standards.

So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore, what God has joined together, man must not separate.

Matthew 19:6

Thoughts for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

The Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time, Matthew 19:3-12, is rich with teaching on marriage and relationships. The Pharisees’ question about divorce leads Jesus to emphasize the sanctity and permanence of marriage. He refers to the creation story, highlighting that marriage is not merely a human contract but a divine covenant. For Catholics, this understanding elevates marriage to the level of a sacrament, reflecting the unbreakable bond between Christ and the Church.

Jesus recognizes the Mosaic law on divorce but explains that it was a concession to human weakness. He calls His followers to a higher standard, focusing on the original intention for marriage. Catholics see in this a call to work on relationships, understanding that difficulties don’t justify ending what God has joined.

The disciples’ response shows that they recognize the gravity of Jesus’ teaching. His reply that not all can accept this word acknowledges the difficulty but also the special calling to marriage. It’s a reminder to Catholics that vocations vary, and each is to be respected and lived out with integrity.

Jesus’ comments about those incapable of marriage or renouncing it for the Kingdom offer a broader perspective on relationships and commitments. It implies an understanding of different life paths, including consecrated single life. Catholics can see here an affirmation of the variety of ways to serve God and others.

Overall, this passage invites reflection on the sacred nature of marital commitment, the call to fidelity, and the respect for various vocations. It’s not just about rules but about the deeper meanings and values that underlie our relationships. For Catholics, it encourages prayerful discernment of vocations and the nurturing of love and respect in all relationships. Whether married or single, it challenges all to see relationships as opportunities to reflect God’s love and faithfulness.

Prayer for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

Loving Father, guide our vocational choices with your wisdom. Help us honor sacred unions, seeking your divine plan. In our relationships, may your grace lead us, drawing us closer to your love. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Marriage as a Reflection of Divine Love

Bishop Robert Barron’s reflection for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time centers on the sacred unity of marriage. He explains that the bonds between a man and a woman in marriage serve a divine purpose, symbolizing an image of the Blessed Trinity. The love between the Father and the Son gives birth to the Holy Spirit, and a married couple’s relationship should reflect this Trinitarian love. According to St. Paul, Christian marriage is meant to symbolize the love between Christ and the Church. Bishop Barron highlights that this relationship is a joyful sharing of the divine life.

USCCB Reflection: A Softened Heart

This USCCB video reflection for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time focuses on the gift of the sacrament of holy matrimony. The message reflects on the contrast between a hardened heart and a contrite heart as described by Jesus in the context of Moses. Jesus encourages people to have a heart that asks for forgiveness and seeks purification, fostering deeper love for God and others. This softening of the heart applies to relationships, including marriage, religious life, and community. The call is to live with attitudes of prayer, contrition, forgiveness, and confession, allowing hearts to be softened and purified.

Frequently Asked Questions for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time

What date is Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Friday August 16, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Friday August 16, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Joshua 24:1-13: Joshua’s Reminder
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ezekiel 16:1-15, 60, 63: The LORD’s Message to Jerusalem
Alternate First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ezekiel 16:59-63: The LORD’s Promise to Re-establish His Covenant
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 136: A Psalm of Gratitude for God’s Enduring Mercy
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Isaiah 12: Praise and Confidence in the LORD’s Salvation
Gospel – Matthew 19:3-12: Jesus’s Teaching on Divorce
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time?

The gospel, Matthew 19:3-12, we encounter themes related to God’s design for marriage, the unity of spouses, the interaction between divine ideal and human imperfection, and the challenges of accepting counter-cultural teachings. These themes offer insights into the complexities of relationships, God’s grace, and the commitment to living out one’s faith.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What is Jesus’s stance on divorce in the Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:3-12)?

Jesus emphasizes the sacredness of marriage and asserts that divorce leads to adultery, except in unlawful marriages.

Why does Jesus mention that not all can accept his teaching on marriage in the Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:3-12)?

He recognizes that the teaching is demanding and not everyone is capable of living it, but it remains the ideal.

How does Jesus’s response to the Pharisees in the Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:3-12) connect to the original intent of marriage?

Jesus returns to the original divine plan for marriage, emphasizing its permanence and sacredness, and contrasts it with Moses’ concession due to human weakness.

How does Jesus’s response to the Pharisees’ question in the Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:3-12) reflect the nature of God’s covenant?

Jesus’s emphasis on the permanence of marriage mirrors the everlasting covenant God promises, showing that human relationships should reflect divine commitments.

How does the view on marriage relate to contemporary issues on relationships in the Gospel for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 19:3-12)?

Jesus’s teachings stress the importance of commitment and the sacred bond of marriage, principles that continue to resonate in modern discussions on relationships.

What is the main theme of Joshua’s recounting of the history of Israel in the First Reading for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Joshua 24:1-13)?

Joshua is emphasizing how God guided the Israelites, providing them with land, cities, and harvests through miracles and divine intervention.

Why does Joshua focus on the miracles and provisions from God in the First Reading for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Joshua 24:1-13)?

Joshua wants to instill gratitude and faith in the Israelites by reminding them of God’s role in their journey.

What is the recurring message in the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 136)?

The Psalm continually praises the Lord’s enduring mercy and recounts specific examples of His power and kindness towards His people.

Why does the Psalmist emphasize the defeat of great kings in the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 136)?

It highlights God’s ability to overcome seemingly insurmountable odds, reinforcing His might and benevolence.

What is the common thread running through the readings for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The readings highlight God’s guidance, provision, and unchanging love. They call for faithfulness to God’s commands, recognizing the divine plan in life’s journey, and appreciating God’s mercy and care.

What metaphor does God use to describe Jerusalem’s unfaithfulness in the First Reading for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ezekiel 16:1-15, 60, 63)?

God compares Jerusalem to a harlot, illustrating its betrayal after being beautified and nurtured by Him.

How does the First Reading for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ezekiel 16:1-15, 60, 63) express God’s mercy despite betrayal?

Despite Jerusalem’s betrayal, God promises to remember His covenant and offers pardon, though with a sense of shame.

What does the LORD’s promise to create an everlasting covenant in the alternate First Reading for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ezekiel 16:59-63) signify?

It signifies God’s unwavering love and commitment to His people, despite their betrayal, reflecting His mercy and the hope of redemption.

What is the central message of the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Isaiah 12)?

The song emphasizes trust in the Lord as savior and strength, urging the faithful to draw joy from salvation and to proclaim His greatness.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Isaiah 12) connect to the theme of salvation in the First Reading?

Both texts speak of God’s mercy and redemption, with Isaiah celebrating the joy that comes from relying on God’s salvation.

What unifies the readings for Friday of the 19th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2, and what lesson can be drawn from them?

The readings reflect themes of commitment, betrayal, and redemption. Despite human failings, God’s love remains steadfast, offering mercy and hope for salvation. These lessons call for faithfulness, humility, and gratitude toward God’s enduring love and grace.

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