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Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10: We thank God for your faith, love, and hope. Your genuine belief has spread far and wide, drawing others toward the living God and away from idols.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – 2 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 11-12: We are filled with gratitude for your ever-growing faith and love. You show great endurance in trials, and we constantly pray that you fulfill your divine calling.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 149: Let’s sing a new song to celebrate our Maker. Dance and play instruments, for the Lord adores us, especially the humble. This joy and praise is the glory of all who are faithful.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 96: Sing a new song to the Lord and bless His name. Announce His salvation every day and share His glory with all people. The Lord, who is great and awesome, made the heavens.
  • Gospel Matthew 23:13-22: Jesus condemns the scribes and Pharisees for their hypocrisy, saying they lock heaven’s gate and mislead followers. He also criticizes their flawed understanding of what is truly sacred.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time

  • Woes to the Pharisees: Jesus’ series of woes directed at the Pharisees highlights the theme of stern rebuke and condemnation. He exposes their hypocrisy and warns of the consequences of their actions.
  • Hindrance to the Kingdom: The theme of hindrance to the kingdom emerges as Jesus accuses the Pharisees of preventing others from entering the kingdom of heaven due to their misguided teachings and behavior.
  • Exploiting Religion for Gain: Jesus’ condemnation of those who “swear by the gold of the temple” exposes the theme of exploiting religion for personal gain. He rebukes those who prioritize material wealth over spiritual reverence.
  • Oaths and Truthfulness: The theme of integrity and truthfulness is evident as Jesus addresses the issue of oaths. He emphasizes the importance of keeping one’s word and being honest in all matters.
  • Prioritizing the Details: The Pharisees’ meticulous tithing of herbs while neglecting justice, mercy, and faith highlights the theme of misplaced priorities. Jesus calls for a balanced approach that emphasizes both details and higher principles.
  • Weightier Matters of the Law: The mention of justice, mercy, and faith as weightier matters underscores the theme of essential principles. Jesus calls for a focus on these foundational aspects rather than getting lost in minor rituals.

Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, you hypocrites. You lock the Kingdom of heaven before men. You do not enter yourselves, nor do you allow entrance to those trying to enter.

Matthew 23:13

Reflection for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time, Matthew 23:13-22, Jesus criticizes the religious leaders of his time for hypocrisy and for leading people away from God rather than toward Him. He points out their focus on minute details and rituals while ignoring the larger, more important issues like justice and mercy.

This passage holds a mirror to our own lives, reminding us that it’s easy to get lost in the rules and lose sight of the bigger picture. Whether it’s at work, in our community, or even within our own families, we can sometimes prioritize protocol over people. That’s a pitfall we should aim to avoid.

Jesus is urging us to focus on what really matters: our relationships with others and with God. In the modern world, this could be as simple as choosing kindness over bureaucracy or opting for understanding rather than judgment when we interact with people who are different from us.

The scripture also warns us not to use religious practices as a show of piety without understanding their true meaning. In today’s terms, it means not just going through the motions, whether it’s attending Mass or participating in community service. Our actions should stem from a genuine desire to do good and to be closer to God.

In summary, the passage nudges us to critically examine our priorities and our motivations. Are we genuinely striving to live a life that reflects the values we claim to hold? It’s a good reminder to focus on the heart of the matter, rather than getting lost in the details.

Prayer for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time

Loving God, guide us to genuine faith and devotion, free from hypocrisy. Protect us from empty actions that lack true sincerity. May our worship be authentic, reflecting our love for you and our commitment to your kingdom. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: The Dual Role of Jesus

In his reflection on the Gospel for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron unpacks Jesus’ harsh criticism of the scribes and Pharisees. According to Bishop Barron, Jesus is both the forgiving hand that the Father extends to sinners and the judge who exposes the world’s hypocrisy. His criticism illuminates the divide between God’s loving intentions and the actions of those in positions of religious authority who perpetuate “structures of darkness.” Jesus’ dual role magnifies the disparity between God’s mercy and the realities of a world complacent in sin.

USCCB Reflection: Navigating Frustration with Faith

This reflection for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time, touches on the theme of frustration, particularly how Jesus expresses it in the gospel. It suggests that the key lies in how we deal with our own frustrations and their impact on others. Jesus criticizes people for locking the Kingdom of Heaven, advising against forced faith and calling out “blind guides.” We should reflect on whether we are the cause of frustration in our spiritual lives and the lives of others. “Holy frustration” can actually deepen our faith and open our hearts.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Monday August 26, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Monday August 26, 2024] are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10: Growing Faith and Love
First Reading (Cycle 2) – 2 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 11-12: Enduring Faith Shared
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 149: Joy in Praise
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 96: Song of Worship
Gospel – Matthew 23:13-22: Warnings to Hypocrites
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Mass readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time?

In the gospel, Matthew 23:13-22, we find themes of stern rebuke to the Pharisees, hindrance to the kingdom due to misguided teachings, exploitation of religion for personal gain, the importance of truthfulness and integrity, the danger of misplaced priorities, and the call to focus on weightier matters of the law. This passage serves as a cautionary reminder to prioritize genuine faith, integrity, and the pursuit of justice and mercy over outward displays of religiosity.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What’s Jesus’ critique in the Gospel for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 23:13-22)?

Jesus condemns the hypocrisy and misleading actions of the scribes and Pharisees. He’s critical of their focus on rituals and laws, which obscures the real essence of faith. He emphasizes that they’ve failed to understand what’s truly sacred.

What’s the primary message of the First Reading for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10)?

Paul is thankful for the Thessalonians’ faith, love, and hope. He praises their sincere belief and mentions how it’s drawing people towards God.

How does the First Reading for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10) relate to the Gospel (Matthew 23:13-22)?

The Gospel also touches on sincerity in faith, but from a critical standpoint. It lambasts those whose faith is hypocritical, contrasting the genuine belief Paul celebrates.

What’s the main theme of the Responsorial Psalm for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 149)?

The Psalm encourages joyful praise of God, emphasizing that this is the glory of the faithful.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 149) connect with the First Reading (1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10)?

Both readings touch on the theme of genuine faithfulness and the joy or goodness that emanates from it.

What unites the readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The focus is on the quality and authenticity of one’s faith—be it good, as in Thessalonica, or poor, as with the scribes and Pharisees.

What’s a practical takeaway for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The readings serve as a reminder to practice one’s faith sincerely and authentically, understanding that true faith has a positive impact, both personally and communally.

What is Paul praising the Thessalonians for in the First Reading for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (2 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 11-12)?

Paul commends the Thessalonians for their growing faith and love, as well as their resilience in the face of trials.

What connection can be drawn between the First Reading for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (2 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 11-12) and the Gospel (Matthew 23:13-22)?

The Gospel is critical of religious leaders for their lack of genuine faith and hypocrisy, which is a stark contrast to the faithfulness of the Thessalonians.

What is the central message of the Responsorial Psalm for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 96)?

The Psalm calls for joyful worship of God, emphasizing the sharing of His salvation and glory with everyone.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 96) relate to the First Reading (2 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 11-12)?

Both passages praise genuine faith and a deep relationship with God, though the Psalm speaks more broadly about proclaiming this faith to all.

How does the Gospel for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 23:13-22) tie in with the other readings for Cycle 2 (2 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 11-12, Psalm 96)?

While the Gospel points out negative examples of faith, the First Reading and Psalm discuss positive faith experiences, creating a contrast that emphasizes the importance of sincere belief.

What’s the common thread among the readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The readings explore the difference between sincere and hypocritical faith, using both positive and negative examples.

What is a practical takeaway for the readings for Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The texts underscore the importance of genuine faith and love, not just for personal growth but also as a beacon for others. This is particularly relevant in challenging times, as shown in the First Reading.

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