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Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Romans 3:21-30: Paul argues that righteousness comes through faith in Jesus Christ, not through the law. He emphasizes that all have sinned but can be justified by God’s grace. Faith is the basis for justification, applicable to both Jews and Gentiles.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Ephesians 1:1-10: Paul addresses the faithful in Ephesus, stating they’ve been spiritually blessed and chosen by God. He emphasizes adoption through Jesus and mentions the forgiveness and wisdom granted through Christ.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 130: In my desperation, I call to the LORD, begging for attention and forgiveness. Despite my sins, I place all my trust in His merciful and redemptive nature.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 98: Celebrate the LORD’s victories and justice with joyful songs and music. His salvation is known to all, deserving our praise from every corner of the earth.
  • Gospel Luke 11:47-54: Jesus condemns those who honor prophets while perpetuating the same injustices that led to the prophets’ deaths. He warns that their actions will bring judgment upon them.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Hypocrisy Exposed: Jesus condemns the Pharisees for building tombs for prophets their ancestors killed. This theme points out the inconsistency in honoring prophets while perpetuating injustices.
  • Responsibility for Blood: Jesus holds that generation accountable for the blood of all prophets. This theme highlights collective accountability for past and present wrongs.
  • Escalation of Tension: The Pharisees and experts in law react by becoming hostile and seeking to trap Jesus in his words. This marks an escalation in the conflict between Jesus and religious leaders.
  • Guarding Knowledge: Jesus criticizes experts in law for withholding the key to knowledge. This theme condemns those who restrict access to spiritual understanding.

Woe to you, scholars of the law! You have taken away the key of knowledge. You yourselves did not enter and you stopped those trying to enter.

Luke 11:52

Thoughts for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, Luke 11:47-54, Jesus once again has harsh criticism of the scholars of the law. Instead of reaching out to the lost, they memorialize prophets whose words they ignore. He criticizes them for their hypocrisy, emphasizing that they are no different from those who persecuted the prophets.

The act of building tombs could be seen as a form of tokenism today. Many times, society acknowledges past injustices or praises historical figures but fails to address ongoing issues that are the modern equivalents of those injustices. Recognizing history is not enough if the underlying attitudes remain unchanged.

The lawyers are criticized for keeping the key to knowledge and not entering themselves, thus hindering others. In contemporary settings, this could be analogous to gatekeeping, where certain people hoard information or opportunities and make them inaccessible to others.

Jesus warns that the new generation is not necessarily absolved of the sins of their ancestors if they continue in the same patterns. This idea pushes us to examine how our actions today may be perpetuating old problems, be they social, moral, or even within our own families.

I have to think about if my religious practices and actions reach out to others or block the way. If I am only concerned with appearing “holy” and making others respect me, I am probably not focused on inviting the lost to join us. Evangelization must come from a place of humility.

The crux of this passage is the call to self-examination. We must scrutinize not just our actions but also the societal structures we’re part of. Being a ‘good’ person in a flawed system requires more than just individual righteousness; it requires an active effort to better the system itself.

Prayer

Lord, let me truly honor those who have gone before me by spreading the Good News with humility. I am often lost and in need of rescue also. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time

Word On Fire: Reaching Out to the Lost

In this reflection for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time, In this reflection, Bishop Robert Barron discusses Jesus’ strong criticism of the scholars of the Law as presented in the Gospel. According to Bishop Barron, Jesus serves as both the hand that God extends to sinners and a judge condemning actions contrary to God’s will. Jesus calls out those who not only fail to embrace the knowledge and love of God but also block others from doing so. This serves as a cautionary tale, highlighting the importance of not standing in the way of others seeking spiritual enlightenment.

USCCB Reflection: Defacing the Church

This USCCB video reflection for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time highlights a rising number of attacks on Catholic Church buildings. Vandalism includes defacing doors, windows, and stealing sacred objects. It emphasizes that these acts are meant to divert the Church from its mission: caring for their community and those in need. The key message is to remember Jesus’ teachings and not lose sight of the church’s purpose, even when faced with hostility. We must pray for those who commit these acts, inviting them into a path of understanding and forgiveness.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Thursday October 17, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Thursday October 16, 2025 are:
First Reading – Romans 3:21-30: Righteousness in Faith
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 130: Cry for Mercy
Gospel – Luke 11:47-54: Woe to Hypocrites

What are the Mass readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The Mass readings for Thursday October 17, 2024 are:
First Reading – Ephesians 1:1-10: Ephesian Greetings
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 98: Sing to the Lord
Gospel – Luke 11:47-54: Woe to Hypocrites

What happens in Luke 11:47-54, the gospel for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Tim?

In this passage, Jesus criticizes the religious leaders for building tombs for the prophets their ancestors killed. He accuses them of being complicit in their ancestors’ deeds and warns that they will be held accountable. After this, the Pharisees and experts in the law become hostile and try to provoke Jesus into making incriminating statements.

What are the themes in the gospel for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time?

The primary themes in Luke 11:47-54 include the indictment of religious hypocrisy, the continuity of rebellion against God’s messengers, and the impending judgment for such actions.

Why does Jesus speak about building tombs for prophets in the gospel for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:47-54)?

Jesus uses the act of building tombs as a metaphor to illustrate how the religious leaders honor the prophets with their words but not with their actions, continuing the cycle of rejecting God’s messengers.

What does Jesus mean by saying leaders will be held accountable in the gospel for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 11:47-54)?

Jesus warns that by continuing in the way of their ancestors—opposing God’s messengers—they are inviting judgment upon themselves. They are part of an ongoing lineage of rebellion and will bear the consequences.

How can the gospel for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time be applied to everyday life?

Luke 11:47-54 serves as a warning against hypocrisy and the dangers of honoring tradition or authority figures without examining one’s own values and actions. It emphasizes the importance of integrity and warns against becoming complicit in systemic or generational injustices.

What is Paul’s main point about righteousness in the first reading for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 3:21-30)?

Paul argues that righteousness doesn’t come through following the law but through faith in Jesus Christ. He emphasizes that everyone has sinned but can be redeemed through God’s grace.

Is faith in Jesus restricted to a particular group in the first reading for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Romans 3:21-30)?

No, Paul makes it clear that faith as the basis for justification is applicable to everyone, both Jews and Gentiles.

What does the psalmist do in times of desperation in the responsorial psalm for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 130)?

In desperation, the psalmist calls to the LORD and seeks His attention and forgiveness. He places his trust in God’s merciful and redemptive nature.

How does the psalmist view his sins in the responsorial psalm for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 130)?

Despite acknowledging his sins, the psalmist places his trust in God’s mercy and redemptive qualities.

What theme is shared across the readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

A common theme is the emphasis on authentic faith and righteousness as opposed to external observances or empty honors.

How do the readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 guide us in dealing with sin and seeking righteousness?

The readings suggest that righteousness is accessible through faith in Jesus and God’s grace, not just ritual or law. They urge us to reflect on our actions and seek authentic faith.

What does Paul say about the faithful in Ephesus in the first reading for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ephesians 1:1-10)?

Paul addresses them as spiritually blessed and chosen by God. He highlights their adoption through Jesus and mentions that they have received forgiveness and wisdom through Christ.

How does Paul describe the benefits of being “in Christ” in the first reading for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Ephesians 1:1-10)?

Being “in Christ” brings about spiritual blessings, including adoption into God’s family, forgiveness, and wisdom. It is essentially a state of grace and divine favor.

What is the central theme of the responsorial psalm for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 98)?

The psalm encourages joyful celebration of the Lord’s victories and justice. It emphasizes that God’s salvation is universally known and deserving of praise.

How does the responsorial psalm for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 98) suggest we should respond to God’s actions?

According to the psalm, God’s victories and justice should be met with joyful songs, music, and praise from every corner of the earth.

What do these readings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 tell us about the nature of faith and action?

Faith isn’t just a matter of being chosen or blessed. It demands an ethical lifestyle that aligns with God’s teachings. Honoring prophets while perpetuating injustice, for example, is anathema to true faith.

How can these teachings for Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 be applied today?

The readings urge us to live authentically in our faith, avoiding hypocrisy and embracing the spiritual blessings and responsibilities that come with being “in Christ.” They call for not only internal faith but also external actions that align with that faith.

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Comments

One response to “Thursday of the 28th Week in Ordinary Time”

  1. Tammara Strock Avatar
    Tammara Strock

    To the young-catholics.com admin, You always provide useful information.

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