An image of a bible with folded hands, to indicate that Lectio Divina is a method of praying with scripture.

About Lectio Divina

Lectio Divina means “divine reading”. It is a prayer practice which trusts that God speaks to us through scripture. This is a practice I started doing regularly a few years ago. I use the book Sacred Space to guide me through my daily Lectio Divina. It provides a reading (based on the gospel of the day) and some elements which make it easier for me to keep up with this practice every day. I also like to use a note-taking Bible to write down a few of my thoughts. But all you really need is a regular Bible.

Lectio Divina is very flexible and allows room for the Holy Spirit to guide us. I do it as an individual. But it could also be done as a family prayer with children or as a prayer in a youth group. The steps are basic, but don’t feel like you are doing it “wrong” if you adapt it to the needs of your family or youth ministry. The important part is to hear God speaking through scripture.

How to Pray with Bible Readings

Opening

The first step in Lectio Divina is to place yourself in God’s presence. Slow down your breathing and just be open to the voice of God speaking through the scripture. Ask the Holy Spirit to guide you.

Lectio

Next, read the scripture passage. I always just read the first time for content. Then I read it again, more slowly. I notice if any word or phrase stands out. Or maybe an idea or picture comes into my mind. I write these in my journal. (Journaling is not absolutely necessary, but I find it very helpful. In a family or youth group setting, you can also just have everyone keep one phrase or word in their thoughts.)

Meditatio

Think about the word or phrase which stood out. Just let it go where it will. I used to think that some of the things I thought were distractions, but I have found that this is often not the case. Lectio Divina, like a sport or a talent, takes some time to develop. You can’t expect to pick up a basketball and be an NBA player. It takes time and practice. Lectio Divina is the same way.

Oratio

In this step, I listen to God. Is there something going on in my life which makes this significant right now? What emotions does it stir up? Are they positive emotions, which make me feel free? Or negative emotions which make me feel unfree? God is speaking to me through these feelings I have. What is God asking me to do? What is making me feel separated from God? What is making me feel closer?

Contemplatio

Go deeper. Is God calling me to change something? To be patient? To action in my community? to forgive someone? To ask for forgiveness? If I feel called to it, I make a commitment to take a concrete action.

Closing

I usually close with a prayer of gratitude or a traditional prayer (Our Father,Glory Be, Hail Mary). Or sometimes I feel like I just need to make the sign of the cross.

Printable Copy

More Resources

Divine Reading: A Lesson Plan on Lectio Divina

This lesson plan will help youth understand the importance of prayerfully reading the Bible to understand how God is speaking to each of us personally through His word.

Video Resource

Fr Josh goes through an example of praying through Scripture using Lectio Divina.

Prayer Before Reading the Bible

This is a traditional Catholic prayer before reading the Bible. It asks God our Father to send His Holy Spirit to make us ready to hear Him.


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