* As an Amazon affiliate, this site earns from qualifying purchases.

Advent Weekday on December 20

Daily Mass Readings for an Advent Weekday on December 20

  • First ReadingIsaiah 7:10-14: God offers Ahaz a sign, which he refuses. Isaiah then prophesies a divine sign: a virgin will conceive and bear a son named Emmanuel, symbolizing God’s enduring presence.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 24: The Lord owns all creation, having established it. Only the pure in heart can approach His holy mountain, receiving blessings and seeking the face of the God of Jacob.
  • Gospel Luke 1:26-38: The angel Gabriel announced to Mary in Nazareth her divine selection to bear Jesus, the Son of the Most High. Initially troubled, Mary questioned how, being a virgin. Gabriel assured her of the Holy Spirit’s role and cited Elizabeth’s miraculous pregnancy as proof of God’s power. Mary humbly accepted her role, expressing obedience to God’s will.

Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you shall name him John. And you will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at his birth, for he will be great in the sight of the Lord.

Luke 1:13

Themes for the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20

  • The Prophecy of Emmanuel: Isaiah’s prophecy of a virgin bearing a son named Emmanuel, meaning “God with us,” is a central Advent theme. It emphasizes God’s promise and the miraculous nature of Jesus’ birth, signifying God’s presence with His people.
  • Mary’s Fiat and Humble Obedience: The Annunciation to Mary by the angel Gabriel highlights Mary’s humility and obedience. Her response, “Let it be to me according to your word,” serves as a model of faithful acceptance of God’s will, despite uncertainty or fear.
  • Purity and Seeking God: Psalm 24’s emphasis on purity of heart and seeking the face of God is a call to spiritual preparation and introspection. It resonates with Advent’s focus on preparing to receive Christ, both in commemorating His birth and in anticipation of His return.
  • The Power of the Holy Spirit: Gabriel’s assurance of the Holy Spirit’s role in Jesus’ conception underscores the power and presence of the Holy Spirit in the incarnation and in the lives of believers. It invites reflection on the Holy Spirit’s continuous action in bringing about God’s plans.
  • God’s Sovereignty and Faithfulness: The readings collectively highlight God’s sovereignty and faithfulness in fulfilling His promises. The divine orchestration evident in these narratives reassures believers of God’s control and His commitment to His covenant with humanity.
  • Miraculous Signs of God’s Power: Both Isaiah’s prophecy and Elizabeth’s pregnancy serve as miraculous signs of God’s power, challenging the limits of human understanding and inviting trust in God’s extraordinary ways.

Thoughts for an Advent Weekday on December 20

The Gospel reading for an Advent weekday on December 20, from Luke 1:26-38, invites us to contemplate the Annunciation, where the angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus, the Son of the Most High. This pivotal moment in the history of salvation is a profound reflection of faith, obedience, and divine mystery.

Mary’s initial reaction, one of trouble and questioning, is a natural human response to the extraordinary. Her inquiry, “How will this be, since I am a virgin?” reflects not skepticism, but a desire to understand the mystery she is being drawn into. This passage encourages us during Advent to embrace the mysteries of faith with humility and openness, recognizing that God’s ways often transcend our understanding. Mary’s journey from perturbation to acceptance mirrors our Advent journey, as we move from the uncertainties and complexities of our lives to a place of trust and acceptance of God’s will.

Gabriel’s assurance to Mary highlights the central role of the Holy Spirit in the Incarnation. This assurance is not just for Mary but for all believers, reminding us that with God, nothing is impossible. The reference to Elizabeth’s miraculous pregnancy further emphasizes this point.

In the season of Advent, as we prepare to celebrate the miraculous birth of Jesus, we are invited to renew our faith in the power and presence of the Holy Spirit in our lives. The Spirit, who overshadowed Mary to bring about the birth of the Savior, is the same Spirit that works within us, enabling us to respond to God’s call with faith and courage. This passage calls us to be open to the Spirit’s work in our lives, leading us into deeper communion with God and empowering us to live out our Christian vocation.

Lastly, Mary’s response, “Behold, I am the servant of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word,” is a model of discipleship and surrender to God’s will. Her humble acceptance of her role as the mother of Jesus is a powerful testament to her faith and obedience.

In the context of Advent, this response challenges us to consider our own openness to God’s will. Are we willing to say, “Let it be to me according to your word,” in our own lives, trusting in God’s plan even when it is beyond our understanding? Mary’s example inspires us to embrace our own callings with faith and humility, trusting that God will guide and sustain us as we participate in His divine plan. As we approach the celebration of Christ’s birth, let us follow Mary’s example, responding to God’s call with a willing and obedient heart.

Prayer

Father, when I am confused and troubled, grant me the grace to trust in you. Let it be done according to your will. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for an Advent Weekday on December 20

Word on Fire: Letting Go

In Bishop Barron’s reflection for an Advent weekday on December 20, he meditates on the Annunciation, where the angel Gabriel tells Mary she will be the mother of God. Mary’s initial confusion and fear, given the gravity and implications of this role, are highlighted. Despite understanding the potential for shame, exile, and suffering, Mary responds with faith and acceptance, declaring herself the handmaid of the Lord. This is a pivotal shift in salvation history: where Adam and Eve’s disobedience marked the beginning of human tragedy, Mary’s surrender to God’s will heralds the start of divine redemption. He notes how medieval commentators saw Mary’s “Ave” as a reversal of “Eva” (Eve), symbolizing a turning point from human fall to divine salvation.

USCCB Reflection: Recognizing Emmanuel

This USCCB video reflection for an Advent weekday on December 20th centers on the concept of Emmanuel, meaning “God with us.” It highlights the awareness of God’s presence in the lives of various biblical figures such as the Virgin Mary, Elizabeth, the shepherds, and wise men. Mary’s experience, marked by an angelic visitation and her complete surrender to God’s will, exemplifies the profound impact of acknowledging Emmanuel. The reflection invites us to notice the signs of God’s presence in everyday life, from waking up each morning to unexpected observations during a daily commute. It emphasizes the importance of surrender and prayer in recognizing and embracing Emmanuel, encouraging reflection on moments when God has been evidently present in our own journeys.

Jesus and the Jewish Roots of Mary: Unveiling the Mother of the Messiah

Dr. Brant Pitre offers an enlightening exploration into the biblical foundations of Catholic beliefs about Mary. By tracing connections from the Garden of Eden to the Book of Revelation, Dr. Pitre skillfully illustrates how ancient Judaism and the Old Testament underpin the understanding of Mary as the new Eve, the Mother of God, and the new Ark of the Covenant, answering pressing questions about her role and significance in the Christian faith. (Sponsored)

Frequently Asked Questions for an Advent Weekday on December 20

What day of the week is an Advent Weekday on December 20?

The next date is Friday December 20, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for an Advent Weekday on December 20?

The Mass readings for Friday December 20, 2024 are:
First Reading – Isaiah 7:10-14: The Sign of Emmanuel
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 24: The Earth Belongs to the Lord
Gospel – Luke 1:26-38: Mary’s Divine Calling

What is the significance of the first reading for an Advent Weekday on December 20?

Isaiah 7:10-14 includes the prophecy of a virgin conceiving a son named Emmanuel, which Christians interpret as foretelling Jesus’ miraculous birth. In Advent, this prophecy is central, symbolizing God’s promise and enduring presence with His people.

What lessons can be drawn from Ahaz’s refusal of a sign in the first reading for an Advent Weekday on December 20?

Ahaz’s refusal in Isaiah 7:10-14 reflects a lack of trust in God, reminding us of the importance of faith and openness to God’s guidance, especially when it defies our expectations or understanding.

How can Isaiah’s message in the first reading for an Advent Weekday on December 20 be applied in our lives today?

Reflect on the ways God is present in daily life, even in challenging times, and how this assurance can guide decision-making and provide comfort.

How does the responsorial psalm for an Advent Weekday on December 20 connect with the themes for the day?

Psalm 24, with its focus on God’s sovereignty and the purity required to approach Him, complements the Advent themes of preparation and holiness. It calls believers to purify their hearts in anticipation of Christ’s coming.

How does the theme of purity in the responsorial psalm for an Advent Weekday on December 20 connect with the virgin birth in Isaiah and Luke?

The purity theme underscores the holiness of the birth of Jesus, born of a virgin, and encourages personal holiness and purity in preparation for receiving Christ.

What does the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20 signify?

Luke 1:26-38 recounts the Annunciation, where the angel Gabriel tells Mary she will bear Jesus. This event is a pivotal moment in Advent, emphasizing God’s intervention in human history and Mary’s role in the incarnation.

In what ways does Mary’s encounter with Gabriel in the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20 exemplify faith and obedience?

Despite initial uncertainty, Mary’s acceptance of her role as Jesus’ mother demonstrates profound faith in God’s plan and willingness to obey, even under extraordinary circumstances.

How can Mary’s response to Gabriel inspire us in the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20?

Mary’s humble acceptance of her role as Jesus’ mother, despite her initial confusion, serves as a model of obedience and faith. During Advent, Luke 1:26-38 inspires believers to trust in God’s plan and be open to His will, even when it seems beyond understanding.

What is the lesson from Mary questioning the angel in the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20?

Mary’s questioning of the angel shows that it’s natural to seek understanding in the face of God’s mysteries. Luke 1:26-38 teaches believers that faith can coexist with seeking clarity and understanding, especially relevant in Advent as we reflect on the mysteries of Christ’s birth.

How does the concept of Emmanuel in Isaiah relate to the Annunciation story in the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20?

The prophecy of “God with us” is realized in the Annunciation, where Mary learns that she will bear Jesus, the embodiment of God’s presence among humanity.

What does Gabriel’s message to Mary in the Gospel for an Advent Weekday on December 20 reveal about God’s intervention in the world?

It shows that God intervenes in human history in unexpected and miraculous ways, working through individuals to fulfill divine purposes.

What overarching message do these readings offer for an Advent weekday on December 20?

These readings collectively emphasize God’s miraculous intervention, the fulfillment of prophecy, and the virtues of purity and obedience. They encourage believers to prepare their hearts and minds to celebrate the mystery of the Incarnation and to welcome Christ with faith and humility.

How can these readings for an Advent weekday on December 20 inspire those facing doubts or uncertainty?

They offer assurance that God is with us in our uncertainties and that faith can guide us through seemingly impossible situations.

In what ways do these readings for an Advent weekday on December 20 challenge our perceptions of God’s plans and timing?

They encourage reevaluating personal expectations of how and when God should act, reminding us that God’s plans often unfold in unexpected ways and times.

Join our email list to receive weekly emails with Catholic reflections and more.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Young Catholics