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Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2

  • First Reading1 Kings 11:29-32; 12:19: Prophet Ahijah, meeting Jeroboam, tore his cloak into twelve pieces, symbolizing Israel’s division. He prophesied Jeroboam would rule ten tribes, leaving one for David’s lineage, marking the start of a lasting rebellion against David’s house.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 81: God urges to worship Him alone, reminding of His deliverance. Despite His guidance, His people strayed, leading to their own way. Yet, He promises swift aid if they return and obey.
  • Gospel Mark 7:31-37: In the Decapolis, Jesus healed a deaf man with a speech impediment through a personal, tactile gesture and the command “Ephphatha,” meaning “Be opened.” Despite Jesus’ request for discretion, the healed man’s story was widely shared, leading to public awe at Jesus’ power to heal and restore.

He put his finger into the man’s ears and, spitting, touched his tongue; then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him, ‘Ephphatha!’ (that is, ‘Be opened!’)

Mark 7:33-34

Themes for the Readings for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2

For Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2, the readings offer rich themes for reflection and discussion. Here are some of the key themes present in these readings:

  • Division and Unity: The first reading from 1 Kings tells the story of the division of Israel, symbolized by Ahijah’s tearing of his cloak into twelve pieces. This not only represents the physical division of the kingdom but also invites reflection on the broader themes of unity and division within communities and the Church.
  • Leadership and Authority: Jeroboam’s rise to power over ten tribes of Israel, as prophesied by Ahijah, highlights themes of leadership, authority, and God’s role in the appointment of leaders. It prompts questions about how leadership is exercised and the divine aspects of authority.
  • Faith and Obedience: The narrative of division also reflects on the consequences of straying from God’s commands, illustrating the importance of faithfulness and obedience to God’s will as central to maintaining unity and harmony.
  • Healing and Restoration: The Gospel reading from Mark showcases Jesus’ miraculous healing of a deaf man with a speech impediment. This event emphasizes themes of healing, both physical and spiritual, and the restoration of individuals to full participation in their community.
  • Communication and Understanding: Jesus’ healing of the man’s speech impediment and the use of the word “Ephphatha” (Be opened) underscore the significance of communication and understanding in building relationships and community.
  • The Power of Witness: Despite Jesus’ request for discretion, the healed man and the witnesses could not keep silent about the miracle. This illustrates the natural desire to share good news and the power of personal testimony in spreading faith.
  • The Messianic Secret: Jesus’ instruction to keep the healing a secret, a theme often referred to as the “Messianic Secret” in Mark’s Gospel, invites reflection on the nature of Jesus’ ministry and the unfolding revelation of His identity and mission.

These themes for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 offer a rich tapestry for reflection, prayer, and action, particularly in the context of the liturgy and personal spiritual growth. They challenge us to consider our own roles within our communities, our response to God’s call, and the ways in which we seek and offer healing and understanding in our relationships.

Thoughts for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2

In the Gospel for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2, we encounter a moment of healing and revelation in the ministry of Jesus. In the region of the Decapolis, a deaf man with a speech impediment is brought to Jesus, embodying the physical and perhaps social isolation experienced by many due to their infirmities. Jesus’ response to this man’s plight is deeply personal and compassionate; He takes the man aside, away from the crowd, and touches him, signaling a direct, intimate connection that transcends mere physical healing.

The command “Ephphatha” – “Be opened” – is not only a directive to the man’s ears and mouth but also a symbolic invitation to all of us. It urges us to open our hearts to God’s grace, to hear His word more clearly, and to proclaim His love more freely. This moment of healing is a powerful testament to the transformative power of Christ’s love, a love that seeks us out in our isolation, touches us in our brokenness, and restores us to fullness of life and community.

This Gospel narrative resonates with the first reading from 1 Kings, where we witness the division of Israel, a community torn apart by its failures in faithfulness. The cloak torn into twelve pieces by the prophet Ahijah symbolizes a kingdom divided, a people fragmented. Yet, in the Gospel, Jesus presents a stark contrast to this division – He is the healer, the unifier, who through His compassionate action, brings about restoration and wholeness.

As we reflect on these readings, we are invited to consider our own areas of ‘deafness’ and ‘speech impediments’ – the ways in which we fail to listen to God and to each other, and the times we struggle to articulate our faith. The healing of the deaf man challenges us to be open to God’s healing grace in our lives, to listen more attentively to His word, and to speak more boldly of His love and mercy.

In a world marked by division and misunderstanding, the call of “Ephphatha” rings out as a beacon of hope, urging us towards greater unity, deeper understanding, and more fervent witness to the Gospel.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, open our ears to hear Your voice and our mouths to proclaim Your love. Heal our divisions, that we may be one in You. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections
for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2

USCCB Reflection: The RCIA and Gospel Healing

The USCCB reflection for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 draws a parallel between the rituals of the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) and the healing of the deaf man in the Gospel. It highlights the significance of the sensory-rich RCIA welcoming ceremonies, where catechumens are marked with the sign of the cross on their senses, echoing the Gospel’s incarnational moment where Jesus uses touch and speech to heal. These rituals underscore the integration of faith with our physical senses, urging us to witness and live out our beliefs through our actions and senses.

Frequently Asked Questions
for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2

What date is Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The next date is Friday February 13, 2026.

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years. For odd numbered years see Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1.

What are the Mass readings for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The Mass readings for Friday February 13, 2026 are:
First Reading  – 1 Kings 11:29-32; 12:19: Jeroboam’s Rise Foretold
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 81: Call to Heed God’s Voice
Gospel – Mark 7:31-37: Miracle in the Decapolis

What is the significance of Jesus’ command “Ephphatha” in the Gospel reading for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

“Ephphatha,” which means “Be opened,” signifies the opening of the deaf man’s ears and the loosening of his tongue, symbolizing a broader spiritual awakening to God’s word and the breaking down of barriers to communication and understanding in the community.

How does the first reading from 1 Kings relate to the Gospel on Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The first reading illustrates the division of Israel, while the Gospel showcases Jesus’ healing, emphasizing themes of unity and restoration. Both readings together invite reflection on the themes of division, healing, and the power of God’s intervention in restoring wholeness.

Why did Jesus take the deaf man aside for healing in the Gospel for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

Jesus took the deaf man aside to offer a personal, intimate encounter, highlighting the individual care and attention He provides, which reflects His approach to healing and ministry, focusing on the dignity and worth of every person.

What does the tearing of the cloak by Ahijah symbolize in the first reading for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The tearing of the cloak into twelve pieces by Ahijah symbolizes the division of the Kingdom of Israel, with ten pieces representing the ten tribes that would follow Jeroboam, signifying a significant shift in the unity and governance of God’s people.

What is the reaction of the people to the miracle in the Gospel reading for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2, and why is it significant?

The people are astonished and say, “He has done all things well,” highlighting the profound impact of Jesus’ miracles on the community and reinforcing His identity as the one who comes to heal, restore, and fulfill God’s promises.

How can the themes of the readings for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 apply to modern life?

The themes of healing, unity, and the importance of listening and communicating can apply to personal growth, community building, and the broader societal need for reconciliation and understanding in today’s often divided world.

Why did Jesus instruct people not to tell anyone about the healing in the Gospel for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

This instruction, part of the Messianic Secret theme in Mark’s Gospel, suggests Jesus’ desire to control the revelation of His identity and mission, preventing misunderstanding of His role as Messiah and focusing on His teachings rather than just His miracles.

What lessons can we learn from the deaf man’s healing in the Gospel for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The healing teaches us about the transformative power of faith, the importance of being open to God’s grace, and the role of Jesus as the restorer who brings wholeness to our lives, both physically and spiritually.

How does the theme of leadership appear in the readings for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

Leadership is reflected in the narrative of Jeroboam’s rise to power and Jesus’ role as a healer and teacher, offering insights into the nature of godly leadership, which is marked by service, compassion, and a commitment to the well-being of the community.

What is the message of hope in the Gospel for Friday of the 5th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The message of hope lies in Jesus’ ability to heal and transform lives, demonstrating that no matter the depth of our ‘deafness’ or isolation, God’s grace can open us to new possibilities of understanding, communication, and community.

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