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Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

Daily Mass Readings for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

  • First ReadingActs 15:1-6: Some believers who were formerly Pharisees argued that Gentile converts must be circumcised and follow the Mosaic Law in order to be saved. The apostles and elders held a council to discuss and resolve this issue, affirming that salvation is through faith in Jesus Christ alone and that Gentile converts do not need to follow the Mosaic Law.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 122: We rejoiced upon entering Jerusalem, standing within its gates. The city, where tribes gather to praise the Lord, houses the thrones of justice of David’s house.
  • Gospel John 15:1-8: Jesus uses the metaphor of a vine and its branches to teach his disciples about the importance of abiding in him. He explains that just as a branch cannot bear fruit unless it remains connected to the vine, his disciples cannot bear spiritual fruit unless they remain connected to him.

Just as a branch cannot bear fruit on its own unless it remains on the vine, so neither can you unless you remain in me. 

John 15:4

Themes for the Readings for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter explores themes of inclusion in the Christian community and the necessity of remaining connected to Jesus. Here are the key themes from the readings:

  • Debate over Gentile inclusion: In Acts, some believers argue that Gentile converts need to follow Jewish customs to be saved. This shows early challenges in defining what it means to follow Christ.
  • The importance of unity and fellowship within the Church: Despite their differences, the apostles and other leaders of the early Christian community came together to discuss and resolve this issue in a spirit of unity and mutual respect.
  • Jesus as the true vine: In the Gospel, Jesus compares Himself to a vine and His followers to branches. This metaphor emphasizes the importance of staying connected to Him.
  • Necessity of remaining in Jesus: Jesus explains that just as branches need the vine to bear fruit, His followers need to stay connected to Him to bear spiritual fruit. This teaches about the source of spiritual life and productivity.
  • Consequences of disconnection: Jesus also warns that branches not connected to the vine will wither and be thrown away. This illustrates the importance of a continuous relationship with Him.

In conclusion, the readings for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter guide us in understanding their relationship with Jesus and the broader Christian community.

Thoughts for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

The readings for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter remind us of the importance of abiding in Christ and living out our faith in the world.

In the first reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we see how Paul and Barnabas are greeted with joy and wonder as they share the Good News of Jesus Christ with the people of Antioch. Despite facing opposition and persecution, they remain steadfast in their mission to spread the Gospel, trusting in the Lord’s guidance and protection.

In the Gospel of John, Jesus tells his disciples that he is the true vine and they are the branches. He urges them to remain in him and bear much fruit, emphasizing the importance of abiding in him for spiritual growth and fruitfulness. Jesus reminds us that without him, we can do nothing, but with him, we can bear much fruit and bring glory to God.

As we reflect on these readings, we are reminded of our own call to abide in Christ and bear fruit in the world. We are called to be witnesses of the Good News and to share our faith with joy and courage, even in the face of opposition and persecution. We are called to remain connected to Christ, allowing him to shape and mold us into his likeness, so that we may bear fruit that glorifies God and builds up his kingdom.

Let us pray for the grace to remain steadfast in our faith, to trust in the Lord’s guidance and protection, and to bear fruit that brings glory to God. May we always abide in Christ, the true vine, and may his love and grace sustain us on our journey of faith.

Prayer for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

Heavenly Father, we ask for the grace to remain steadfast in our faith and to trust in your guidance and protection. May we always remain connected to Christ, the true vine, and bear fruit that brings glory to your holy name. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

Word on Fire: Participants

Bishop Robert Barron reflects on the Gospel for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter, where Jesus compares Himself to a vine and His followers to branches, emphasizing the importance of being actively connected to Him. He suggests that Jesus seeks not just worshippers but active participants in His life and mission. The idea of “divinization,” where humans partake in the divine nature, is highlighted as the ultimate goal. This concept is supported by the Incarnation—God becoming human so that humans might share in God’s divine nature. This transformative relationship is crucial for understanding our purpose and experiencing spiritual power.

USCCB Reflection: The True Vine

This USCCB video reflection for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter discusses Jesus describing Himself as the True Vine and His followers as branches in John 15. Jesus emphasizes the necessity of staying connected to Him, saying, “without me you can do nothing.” This teaches us that our efforts in family, work, and community service can only bear fruit if we remain close to Him. By adhering to Jesus’ words and partaking in the sacraments, we find meaning and strength in our actions. This connection allows us to accomplish great things for God’s glory and serve others with joy and humility.

Questions and Answers for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter

What date is Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter?

The next date is Wednesday May 21, 2025.

What are the Mass readings for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter?

The Mass readings for Wednesday May 21, 2025 are:
First Reading – Acts 15:1-6: The Jerusalem Meeting
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 122: Rejoicing in Worship
Gospel – John 15:1-8: Abiding in Christ

What issue did the apostles and elders address in Acts 15:1-6?

They discussed whether Gentile converts to Christianity need to be circumcised and follow the Jewish Mosaic Law to be saved.

What decision was eventually made about the Mosaic Law for Gentiles?

The apostles and elders decided that Gentile converts do not need to follow the Mosaic Law or be circumcised to be saved. They affirmed that salvation comes through faith in Jesus Christ alone.

What metaphor does Jesus use in the Gospel for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter?

Jesus uses the metaphor of a vine and its branches to explain the relationship between Him and His followers.

What does Jesus mean by saying His disciples must “abide in Him”?

Jesus means that His disciples must stay closely connected to Him, like branches to a vine, to grow spiritually and do good things according to God’s will.

What happens to branches that do not stay connected to the vine according to Jesus?

Branches that do not stay connected to the vine cannot bear fruit and will eventually be removed and discarded.

Why is the metaphor of the vine important for understanding Jesus’ message?

The metaphor helps explain that a close and continuous relationship with Jesus is essential for living a fruitful life that reflects Christian values and teachings.

How does this discussion in Acts 15 relate to the Gospel message for Wednesday of the 5th Week of Easter?

The decision in Acts 15 shows that faith in Jesus, rather than adherence to old laws, is what keeps believers spiritually connected and fruitful, similar to branches on a vine.

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