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Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Tobit 11:5-17: Anna eagerly waits for her son’s return. When he arrives accompanied by the angel Raphael. Tobiah heals Tobit’s blindness with a divine remedy, leading to a joyous reunion and celebration among the family and their community in Nineveh.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – 2 Timothy 3:10-17: Remain faithful to the teachings and scriptures you have known since infancy, for they provide wisdom and salvation in Christ Jesus, while those who seek to live religiously will face persecution, and wicked individuals will continue to deceive and deteriorate.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 146: Praise the LORD with all your soul, for He is forever faithful, just, providing, compassionate, and reigns eternally as your God.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 119: Unwavering in the face of persecution, I find peace and fulfillment in loving and obeying your eternal law.
  • Gospel Mark 12:35-37: Jesus challenges the understanding of the scribes by posing a question about the relationship between the Messiah and King David, revealing that the Messiah is greater than David and deserving of reverence. This passage emphasizes the divine authority and exalted nature of Jesus as the Messiah, surpassing the human lineage of David.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Jesus’ Authority: The passage highlights Jesus’ authority as a teacher and Messiah. He questions the religious leaders about the Messiah’s identity, implying that he himself is the Son of God with divine authority.
  • The Messiah’s Identity: Jesus raises the question of the Messiah’s identity and challenges the common understanding of the religious leaders. He quotes from Psalm 110 to suggest that the Messiah is more than just a human descendant of David; he is David’s Lord, indicating his divine nature.
  • Scripture Interpretation: Jesus uses this interaction to teach the importance of careful interpretation of scripture. He demonstrates that the religious leaders had missed the deeper meaning of the scriptures they held sacred, emphasizing the need for spiritual insight and understanding.

Thoughts for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

In Mark 12:35-37, the gospel for Friday of the 9th week in ordinary time, Jesus challenges the religious leaders’ understanding of the Messiah. He questions how they can claim that the Christ is simply the son of David. Jesus wants them to see that the Messiah is more than a human king; He is the Son of God with divine authority.

This passage also invites us as Catholics to reflect on our own perception of Jesus. Do we truly recognize Him as the Son of God and our Lord and Savior? Embracing Jesus in this way demands a response from us. We must surrender our lives to Him, have faith in Him, and study Scripture to deepen our understanding of His identity.

By acknowledging Jesus as the Son of God and studying His Word, we can experience His transformative power in our lives and share His love and truth with others. Let us respond to His call and grow in faith as we recognize Jesus as the ultimate source of joy, peace, and eternal life.

Prayer for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

Heavenly Father, open our hearts to recognize Jesus as the Son of God, our Lord and Savior, beyond mere human understanding. Grant us the grace to surrender our lives to Him, deepen our faith, and share His love with others. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

Word on Fire: Recognizing Jesus as Lord

In a reflection by Bishop Robert Barron for Friday of the 9th week in Ordinary Time, he invites us to consider whether we truly recognize Jesus as Lord in every aspect of our lives. By surrendering to Christ’s lordship, we can experience a lighter, more joyful existence, free from the burdens of self-centeredness and sin.

USCCB Reflection: Opening Our Eyes

This is a video reflection by DJ Bernal for the Friday of the 9th week in Ordinary Time, shared by the USCCB. We reflect on the theme of sight and praise, highlighting the story of Tobit and emphasizing the importance of opening our eyes to see the truth and praising God every day. The takeaway for the week is to choose one small thing each day to praise God and discuss it with Him in evening prayers.

Frequently Asked Questions for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time

What date is Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Friday June 5, 2026.

What are the Mass readings for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Friday June 5, 2026 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Tobit 11:5-17: The Miraculous Healing: A Joyous Reunion in Nineveh
First Reading (Cycle 2) – 2 Timothy 3:10-17: The Call to Faithfulness in the Face of Persecution
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 146: Eternal Praise: Celebrating the Faithfulness and Reign of the LORD
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 119: Peace in Persecution: Embracing the Eternal Law
Gospel – Mark 12:35-37: The Messiah’s Authority: Beyond the Lineage of David
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Mass readings for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time?

Some themes include Jesus’ authority, the Messiah’s identity, and scripture interpretation, highlighting Jesus’ divine authority as the Son of God, challenging the religious leaders’ understanding of the Messiah’s identity, and emphasizing the importance of spiritual insight in interpreting scripture.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Friday of the 9th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

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