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Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

Friday July 19, 2024

Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) - Exodus 11:10-12:14: Moses and Aaron performed wonders but Pharaoh was obstinate. The LORD instructed the Israelites to celebrate Passover, sparing their firstborn through the blood-marked houses. It became a perpetual feast.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) - Isaiah 38:1-6, 21-22, 7-8: The prophet Isaiah announced Hezekiah's impending death. Hezekiah prayed, and God granted him 15 more years of life. As a sign, the sun's shadow reversed ten steps.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) - Psalm 116: With gratitude, I'll take the cup of salvation, call on the name of the LORD, and offer thanksgiving sacrifices. Precious to God is the death of His faithful ones.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) - Isaiah 38: In despair, I thought I'd die. But the LORD saved me, granting health and life. My dwelling may be struck down, but I shall not die; God's protection sustains me.
  • Gospel - Matthew 12:1-8: Jesus and His disciples are accused by the Pharisees of breaking the Sabbath when they pluck and eat grain on a Sabbath day. Jesus reminds them of the time when David and his companions ate the consecrated bread in the temple, which was technically unlawful, but they were not condemned. Jesus declares that He is greater than the temple and asserts His authority over the Sabbath, stating that it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Sabbath Controversy: The passage describes a conflict between Jesus and the Pharisees over the observance of the Sabbath. The Pharisees accuse Jesus and His disciples of breaking the Sabbath by plucking grain to eat on a Sabbath day.
  • Jesus as Lord of the Sabbath: Jesus responds by affirming His authority as the Son of Man and the Lord of the Sabbath. He argues that the Sabbath was made for humanity's benefit and not to be a burden.
  • Mercy and Compassion: Jesus uses the example of David and his companions eating the consecrated bread to highlight the importance of compassion and human need, demonstrating that mercy takes precedence over rigid adherence to the law.
  • Greater Than the Temple: Jesus declares that something greater than the temple is present among them, referring to Himself as the ultimate expression of God's presence and authority.
  • Understanding God's Desire: Jesus quotes Hosea 6:6, emphasizing God's desire for mercy and acknowledgment of Him rather than merely ritualistic sacrifice and religious practices.
  • Challenging Religious Legalism: The passage confronts the religious legalism of the Pharisees and emphasizes the importance of understanding God's heart and priorities over strict adherence to external rules.

Thoughts for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time, Jesus encounters opposition from the Pharisees regarding the actions of his disciples on the Sabbath. The disciples, feeling hungry, pluck heads of grain and eat them as they pass through the grain fields. The Pharisees, strictly observing Sabbath regulations, accuse Jesus's disciples of breaking the law.

In response, Jesus refers to the Scriptures, recounting stories of King David and the priests in the temple, who, under certain circumstances, engaged in activities that could be considered Sabbath violations. Jesus asserts that even though these actions were technically against the law, they were not condemned because the higher principle of mercy took precedence.

Jesus then proclaims himself as "Lord of the Sabbath," indicating his authority and the deeper significance of the Sabbath observance. He emphasizes that the Sabbath is not merely about rigid adherence to rules, but about understanding the heart of God, who desires mercy and compassion over legalistic sacrifices.

As we reflect on this passage, we are reminded of the importance of understanding the spirit behind religious practices. It teaches us to approach God with a heart of compassion, empathy, and love. While religious traditions and regulations have their place, they should never override the core values of mercy, kindness, and grace.

This passage challenges us to examine our own hearts and attitudes towards religious observance. Do we prioritize legalism over love? Are we quick to condemn others based on external actions, without considering the deeper motivations behind their choices?

May this passage prompt us to seek a deeper understanding of God's heart and intentions. Let us embrace a spirit of compassion, showing love and mercy to others in all circumstances. May we recognize Jesus as the Lord of our lives, even in how we approach religious practices, and strive to follow his example of love and mercy in all that we do.

Prayer for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

Lord Jesus, teach us to understand the spirit of the law and the essence of mercy, so that we may prioritize acts of compassion and love over rigid adherence to rules. May we follow your example of showing understanding and grace, valuing the sanctity of human life above legalistic interpretations, and truly live out the heart of your Gospel. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

Word on Fire: A Path to Transformation

On Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron explains that Jesus emphasizes His ministry's theme: "I desire mercy, not sacrifice," correcting the Pharisees. Catholic spirituality recognizes that every saint had a past, and every sinner has a future. Conversion is pivotal in the lives of these heroes of faith. God's mercy is likened to oil, generously poured upon us without reservation, not because it's earned but because of His love for us. We aren't loved by God because we are worthy; we are worthy because He loves us. Embracing His mercy transforms us, despite our undeserving nature. Soaking in His limitless mercy becomes a path to inner change and spiritual growth.

USCCB Reflection: Jesus, Our Passover Lamb

In this USCCB video reflection for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time, the focus is on the transition from the Old Testament Passover to Jesus Christ as the new Passover Lamb. The reflection highlights how Jesus fulfills the Old Testament law and becomes the sacrificial Lamb, offering freedom and blessings to those who remember and follow Him. It emphasizes the significance of Jesus as the Lord of the Sabbath, inviting believers to encounter Him as the ultimate source of spiritual liberation and eternal life.

Frequently Asked Questions for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time

What date is Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Friday July 19, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for July 19, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) - Exodus 11:10-12:14: The Passover: A Perpetual Institution
First Reading (Cycle 2) - Isaiah 38:1-6, 21-22, 7-8: Hezekiah's Healing and the Sun's Miracle
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) - Psalm 116: Grateful Heart's Response
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) - Isaiah 38: Gratitude for Renewed Life
Gospel - Matthew 12:1-8: Lord of the Sabbath
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What are the themes for the Gospel for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time?

The gospel for July 19, 2024 highlights Jesus' authority over the Sabbath and His call for compassion and understanding in interpreting God's law. It challenges religious legalism and emphasizes the importance of prioritizing God's heart and mercy in our actions. The passage invites believers to recognize Jesus' authority and to seek to understand and align with God's desires rather than being bound by rigid religious practices.
See the themes section of this page for an expansion on these themes for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What is the main message of the Gospel for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 12:1-8)?

The main message of the Gospel passage is Jesus' response to the Pharisees' accusation against His disciples' actions on the Sabbath. Jesus explains that acts of mercy are more important than strict adherence to religious rituals. He declares Himself as the Lord of the Sabbath, highlighting His authority to interpret the Law.

How does Jesus' response in the Gospel for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time (Matthew 12:1-8) challenge the religious authorities' understanding of the Sabbath?

Jesus' response challenges the religious authorities' understanding of the Sabbath by emphasizing the importance of mercy over rigid adherence to religious rules. He points out that acts of mercy and compassion, like feeding the hungry, are in harmony with the true spirit of the Sabbath and God's intentions.

What is the significance of the First Reading for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 11:10—12:14)?

The First Reading recounts the institution of the Passover feast by God to the Israelites in Egypt. God instructs them to procure a lamb, without blemish, for each household. The lamb's blood is to be applied to the doorposts and lintels of their homes. The Passover meal is to be eaten with unleavened bread and bitter herbs, signifying the Israelites' deliverance from slavery.

How does the Passover feast described in the First Reading for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Exodus 11:10—12:14) foreshadow Christ's sacrifice?

The Passover feast foreshadows Christ's sacrifice because, like the lamb's blood marking the houses and sparing the Israelites, Christ's blood spares humanity from eternal death. Jesus becomes the sacrificial Lamb of God, whose death and resurrection provide salvation and deliverance from sin and death.

What is the central theme of the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 116)?

The central theme of Psalm 116 is gratitude and thanksgiving to the Lord for His mercy and deliverance. The psalmist expresses appreciation for God's goodness and faithfulness, vowing to offer sacrifices of thanksgiving and call upon the name of the Lord.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 116) resonate with the theme of the First Reading (Exodus 11:10—12:14)?

The Responsorial Psalm resonates with the theme of the First Reading by expressing gratitude and thanksgiving for God's deliverance. Both readings emphasize the importance of recognizing God's faithfulness and responding with heartfelt appreciation for His saving actions.

What can we learn from the readings for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The readings teach us about God's deliverance, the importance of gratitude and thanksgiving, and the significance of acts of mercy and compassion. The First Reading introduces the Passover feast, foreshadowing Christ's sacrifice for our redemption. The Responsorial Psalm reminds us to offer thanksgiving for God's mercy and faithfulness. The Gospel challenges us to focus on acts of mercy and compassion, recognizing Jesus' authority to interpret the Law. These readings encourage us to deepen our faith, respond with gratitude, and embrace acts of love and compassion in imitation of Christ.

What is the significance of the First Reading for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Isaiah 38:1-6, 21-22, 7-8)?

The First Reading recounts the story of King Hezekiah's illness and miraculous healing. When Hezekiah was told he would die, he turned to the Lord in prayer, reminding God of his faithful conduct. In response to his prayer, the Lord granted him healing, adding fifteen years to his life, and promised to protect his city from the Assyrians.

How does the story of Hezekiah's healing in the First Reading for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Isaiah 38:1-6, 21-22, 7-8) illustrate the power of prayer and God's mercy?

The story of Hezekiah's healing demonstrates the power of prayer and God's mercy. Hezekiah's earnest and wholehearted prayer moved the Lord to grant him healing and extend his life. It serves as a reminder of God's willingness to respond to the prayers of His faithful people with compassion and mercy.

What is the central theme of the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Isaiah 38:10, 11, 12abcd, 16)?

The central theme of the Responsorial Psalm is gratitude for God's saving intervention. The author rejoices in the Lord's deliverance, acknowledging that God has saved him from the brink of death and granted him health and life.

How does the Responsorial Psalm for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Isaiah 38:10, 11, 12abcd, 16) express gratitude and trust in God's saving power?

The Responsorial Psalm expresses gratitude by acknowledging that the Lord has saved the psalmist from death, turning his mourning into joy. The psalmist places his trust in God's saving power, recognizing that God's protection is the source of his life and well-being.

What can we learn from the readings for Friday of the 15th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2?

The readings teach us about the power of prayer, God's mercy, gratitude for His saving intervention, and the importance of showing mercy and compassion. The First Reading shows how earnest prayer can move God to grant healing and mercy. The Responsorial Psalm expresses gratitude for God's saving power. The Gospel challenges us to prioritize mercy and compassion over legalistic interpretations of religious rules. These readings encourage us to trust in God's merciful love, show gratitude for His interventions, and follow Jesus' example by extending mercy to others.

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