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Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Hebrews 2:5-12: God entrusted the world to humans, not angels. Though not all is under human control, Jesus, briefly lower than angels, now reigns in glory, having tasted death for all, leading us to salvation.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 8: God’s majesty echoes across the earth. He regards humanity, slightly below angels, with glory and honor, entrusting them with dominion over all creation, from land to sea.
  • Gospel Mark 1:21-28: In Capernaum’s synagogue, Jesus’ teaching, marked by exceptional authority, astonished the people. His authority was dramatically displayed when He commanded an unclean spirit to leave a possessed man. The spirit’s compliance and dramatic exit left the congregation amazed, sparking discussions about Jesus’ powerful teachings and command over spirits. This event significantly enhanced Jesus’ renown throughout Galilee.

Jesus came to Capernaum with his followers, and on the sabbath he entered the synagogue and taught. The people were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one having authority and not as the scribes.

Mark 1:21-22

Themes for the Readings for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

The themes for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, reflected in the Mass readings, revolve around authority, the dignity of humanity, and the manifestation of God’s power in Jesus Christ. Here’s a deeper look at each theme:

  1. Divine Authority and Human Dignity: Both the First Reading from Hebrews and the Responsorial Psalm (Psalm 8) highlight the special place humans hold in creation. They are made a little lower than angels and crowned with glory and honor. This reflects the divine authority given to humanity over creation, emphasizing the dignity and responsibility humans bear.
  2. The Incarnation and Redemption: The First Reading speaks of Jesus, who, though He was briefly made lower than the angels, now reigns in glory. His tasting of death for everyone underlines the central Christian belief in the incarnation and redemption. Jesus’ suffering and death are seen as the path to salvation for humanity.
  3. The Authority of Jesus’ Teaching and Actions: The Gospel from Mark showcases Jesus’ authority in teaching and His power over unclean spirits. This narrative illustrates not only the wisdom of Jesus’ words but also His divine power, which astonishes and amazes the people. It underscores the concept that Jesus’ authority is not just in words but also in His miraculous actions.
  4. Revelation of the Kingdom of God: The Gospel event is a revelation of the Kingdom of God breaking into the world. Jesus’ command over unclean spirits signifies the breaking of the old order and the establishment of a new one where evil and sin are overcome by God’s power.
  5. Humanity’s Role in God’s Plan: The readings collectively emphasize the role of humanity in God’s plan. Humans are not only recipients of God’s love and salvation but are also entrusted with responsibilities in the created world. This ties back to the theme of stewardship and the call to live in a way that reflects the glory and honor bestowed by God.

For those planning lessons, homilies, or discussions, these themes invite reflection on the nature of Jesus’ authority, the dignity and responsibility of being human, and how the incarnation and redemption through Christ transforms our understanding of both God and humanity. It also opens up discussions on how we live out this entrusted authority in our daily lives, in alignment with God’s will and plan.

Thoughts for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

In the Gospel for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, we encounter Jesus in the synagogue of Capernaum, teaching with an authority that astonishes His audience. This episode, occurring early in Mark’s Gospel, sets the tone for Jesus’ public ministry, illustrating not only His wisdom but His divine power.

The synagogue scene in Capernaum reveals a fundamental truth about the nature of Jesus’ ministry. Unlike the scribes, whose authority was often rooted in tradition and scholarly interpretation, Jesus speaks as one having direct authority. His teachings are not mere interpretations or discussions; they are proclamations of a new reality, the Kingdom of God. When Jesus speaks, He does not just convey information; He transforms reality.

This transformative power is vividly demonstrated when Jesus encounters a man with an unclean spirit. The spirit’s immediate recognition of Jesus as the “Holy One of God” and subsequent compliance to Jesus’ command to leave the man is a dramatic display of Jesus’ authority over the spiritual realm. Here, Mark is not just telling us about a miraculous healing; he is showing us that in Jesus, the Kingdom of God has power over all realms, visible and invisible. This event underscores the inbreaking of God’s kingdom into the world, a kingdom where evil and sin are not just opposed but decisively defeated.

Connecting this with the First Reading from Hebrews, we see a deeper theological context. The author of Hebrews speaks of Jesus, who was made lower than the angels for a short time, now crowned with glory and honor because of His suffering and death. This passage reminds us that Jesus’ authority comes through His humanity and His sharing in our suffering. It is through His incarnation and passion that Jesus fully reveals His divine authority and brings about our salvation.

Similarly, the Responsorial Psalm (Psalm 8) complements this understanding. It marvels at how God has made humanity a little lower than the angels, crowning us with glory and honor. The psalm reflects on the dignity of the human person, created in the image and likeness of God and entrusted with the stewardship of creation. This dignity and responsibility find their fullest expression in Jesus Christ, who, though divine, fully embraced human nature.

In our reflection on this Gospel, we are invited to contemplate the authority of Jesus. This authority is not coercive or oppressive; it is liberating and life-giving. Jesus’ authority brings healing and freedom, casting out that which binds and oppresses us. In our own lives, we are called to recognize and submit to this authority, allowing Christ to reign in our hearts and actions.

Furthermore, as followers of Christ, we are invited to participate in His authority. Just as Jesus was entrusted with authority and used it for healing and liberation, we too are called to exercise the authority we have been given responsibly and lovingly. This means using our gifts, talents, and positions not for personal gain or domination but for service, stewardship, and the spreading of the Gospel.

In conclusion, Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 invites us to reflect on the nature of true authority as embodied in Jesus Christ. His authority, rooted in His divine identity and manifested through His human experience, challenges us to rethink our concepts of power and leadership. As we journey through Ordinary Time, let us seek to emulate Jesus’ example of authority exercised in humility, service, and love.

Prayer

Lord Jesus, grant us the grace to recognize Your authority in our lives. May we follow Your example of humble service, trusting in Your power to heal, liberate, and transform us. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

Word on Fire: Cleansing Power

In this reflection for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, Bishop Robert Barron emphasizes that Jesus seeks to cleanse our hearts, much like He drove out the unclean spirit in the Capernaum synagogue. He highlights that our hearts should be temples of God’s presence, but often they’re filled with worldly desires like money, success, or pleasure. Bishop Barron references Fulton J. Sheen, discussing the “expulsive power” of Christ to remove these misplaced priorities and restore God to the center of our lives. When we invite Jesus into our hearts through conversion, He acts as a nonviolent warrior and judge, cleansing us with His divine authority and power.

USCCB Reflection: A Powerful Sign

In the USCCB reflection for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, the focus is on Jesus’ authority and power, as seen in Mark’s Gospel. The passage describes Jesus’ baptism, His temptation in the desert, the calling of the apostles, and His teaching in the synagogue.

The key moment is when Jesus drives out an evil spirit, demonstrating His power over evil. This act symbolizes the expulsion of sin while maintaining the dignity of the person. The reflection emphasizes that our encounters with God, especially in church, are opportunities for cleansing and drawing closer to God. It concludes by urging believers to recognize and proclaim the reality of Christ, rather than leaving the acknowledgment of His divinity to evil forces.

Frequently Asked Questions for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

What liturgical date is Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The next date is Tuesday January 14, 2025.

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years. For even numbered years see Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2.

What are the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Tuesday January 14, 2025 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Hebrews 2:5-12: Humanity and Jesus’ Sacrifice
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 8: Dominion of Humanity
Gospel – Mark 1:21-28: Authority Over Unclean Spirits

What is the significance of the Gospel reading for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

This Gospel from Mark illustrates Jesus’ divine authority and power over evil, showcasing His role in establishing God’s kingdom on Earth.

How does the First Reading from Hebrews relate to the Gospel for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Hebrews highlights Jesus’ humanity and His exaltation above angels, complementing the Gospel’s emphasis on Jesus’ divine authority and His role in salvation.

What message does Psalm 8 convey in the context of these readings for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Psalm 8 reflects on the dignity and honor of humanity, created slightly lower than angels, resonating with the themes of human responsibility and divine authority in the other readings.

How can we apply the teachings from these readings for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 in our daily lives?

By recognizing Jesus’ authority in our lives, embracing humility, and using our gifts for service and stewardship in alignment with God’s will.

Why is Jesus’ authority emphasized in the Gospel reading for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The authority of Jesus is central to understanding His identity as the Son of God and His mission of salvation, healing, and liberating humanity from sin.

What is the significance of Jesus casting out an unclean spirit in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

This act signifies the power of God’s kingdom breaking into the world, demonstrating Jesus’ power over evil and His mission to restore creation.

How does the theme for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 of Jesus being ‘lower than angels’ relate to His mission?

It underscores His incarnation, where He fully embraced human nature, allowing Him to suffer, die, and ultimately triumph over death for our salvation.

How can we reflect on Jesus’ authority in our own lives during Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

On this day, we can meditate on how Jesus’ authority, shown in the Gospel, influences our decisions, guides our actions, and helps us overcome personal struggles with faith and morality.

What role does humility play in understanding Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 readings?

These readings call us to embrace humility, recognizing our limitations and God’s greatness, as Jesus Himself, though divine, displayed humility in His earthly ministry.

How can we exercise stewardship as reflected in the readings for Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

We can be good stewards by responsibly using our talents, resources, and time to care for creation, help others, and spread the love and message of Christ.

In what ways can the theme of Jesus’ teaching authority from Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, impact Christian educators and leaders?

Catholic educators and leaders can draw inspiration from Jesus’ example to lead with authority rooted in love, truth, and a deep commitment to the well-being of those they serve.

How does the concept of Jesus being ‘lower than angels’ yet reigning in glory, as mentioned in the First Reading of Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time, Cycle 1 inspire Christians in their personal struggles?

This concept can inspire Christians to persevere through trials, knowing that Jesus, too, faced challenges but was exalted, promising hope and glory for those who remain faithful.

What lessons about divine authority versus human authority can we learn from Tuesday of the 1st Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

These readings teach us the difference between earthly authority, often flawed and limited, and divine authority, which is perfect, just, and rooted in the ultimate truth of God’s Word.

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