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30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 25, 2026

Mass Readings for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

  • First Reading – Exodus 22:20-26: Do not oppress aliens, widows, or orphans; I will hear their cries. Don't charge interest to your poor neighbors, and return pledged cloaks before sunset. I am compassionate.
  • Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 18: I love you, Lord, for you are my strength, rock, and deliverer. Praised be the Lord; I am safe from enemies and blessed. You give victories and show kindness.
  • Second Reading – 1 Thessalonians 1:5C-10: You followed our example and the Lord's, receiving the word even in hardship. Your faith has become a model for believers far and wide, and you've turned from idols to serve God.
  • Gospel – Matthew 22:34-40: A scholar tests Jesus on the greatest commandment. Jesus says it's to love God fully and the second is like it, love your neighbor as yourself. These sum up all law and prophets.

You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.

Matthew 22:37

Themes for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

The readings for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A are a call to love. The first reading tells how we are to treat other people, especially the poor, oppressed, and marginalized. The second reading reminds us that how we live should show that we are followers of Jesus. And in the gospel Jesus gives us the Great Commandment and the Golden Rule.

  • Greatest Commandments: Asked about the greatest commandment, Jesus sums up the law with love for God and neighbor. This theme focuses on the core ethical guidelines in religious practice.
  • Test of Understanding: The Pharisees test Jesus, making this another episode where they try to entrap him. The theme here is the ongoing tension and challenges posed by religious authorities.
  • Unified Teaching: Jesus unifies love for God and love for neighbor into a single teaching. This shows the interconnectedness of religious devotion and social ethics.

See the Homilies and Reflections section and the More Thoughts section for further expansion on these readings and some reflection questions for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A.

Resources for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

What Is Love Lesson Plan
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What Is Love? Reflection and Questions

The Gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Matthew 22:34-40) focuses on the two greatest commandments: loving God and loving your neighbor. This lesson plan asks what love really is and presents questions for contemplation. Both the Gospel and the reflection emphasize that love is not just a feeling, but also an action. They both suggest that genuine love for God manifests in love for others. By questioning how we demonstrate love, the reflection offers a way to gauge if we're truly following the core teachings in Matthew's Gospel. It acts as a practical guide to understand and embody these key commandments.

Corporal Works of Mercy
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Do One of the Corporal Works of Mercy

The Gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Matthew 22:34-40) tells us to love God and our neighbor. TheCorporal Works of Mercy are actions that help our neighbors in tangible ways. Loving your neighbor isn't just a feeling, but an action. The Corporal Works of Mercy serve as practical ways to live out the Gospel's teachings. By engaging in these actions, like feeding the hungry or visiting the sick, you are actively fulfilling the second greatest commandment: to love your neighbor as yourself.

A Prayer to God My Rock

Psalm 18 is for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A. It's a thankful prayer to God, our rock, who helps us in tough times. It says, "God, you're my rock, and I depend on your strength." This prayer is based on Psalm 18. Even though we might not understand everything God does, He hears our cries and rescues us. By following God's rules, we stay close to His strength and aren't scared. The prayer reminds us that God is our source of life and strength.

The Book of Exodus
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The Book of Exodus: Lessons on Freedom, Faith, and Leadership

The Book of Exodus details the Israelites' escape from Egyptian slavery and their journey under Moses' leadership. This event is central to their identity as God's chosen people. The book also includes the Ten Commandments, which serve as moral guidelines for living a just life. The 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A focuses on Exodus 22:20-26, urging compassion and fairness towards marginalized people. Both the historical journey and these specific teachings stress the importance of ethical conduct and social justice. The messages from Exodus remain relevant, offering enduring lessons on moral living and faith.

the gospel of matthew
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Resources for the Gospel of Matthew

The Gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A is from Matthew 22:34-40 and centers on the two greatest commandments: love God and love your neighbor. This article provides an overview of the Gospel of Matthew as a whole. Both sources emphasize the importance of love as an action, not just a feeling. Matthew’s Gospel often focuses on ethics and righteous living, making the specific passage about the two commandments a key message within that larger context. Reading Matthew as a whole can give you a broader understanding of why these commandments are pivotal and how they relate to the other teachings presented.

Homilies and Reflections for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 25, 2026

Loving God by Loving Others

Jeff Cavins talks about his experience as a Protestant pastor before becoming Catholic, mentioning how he initially saw people as obstacles to his joy. He discusses that our relationship with God isn't just vertical (God and me) but also horizontal (God, me, and you). In Matthew 22:34-40 Jesus outlines the greatest commandments: to love God and love your neighbor. Cavins emphasizes that to truly express love for God, one must show kindness and love towards others, even those considered 'less than lovable'. He encourages the listener to practice this form of love in various aspects of life, like work and family.

Wanting to Fix People

Father Mike Schmitz argues against the tendency to "fix, replace, or ignore" people, especially in relationships. Instead, he promotes acceptance, delight, and love. His message aligns with the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Matthew 22:34-40, where Jesus states the greatest commandments are to love God and love your neighbor as yourself. Fr. Mike essentially calls for practicing these commandments in everyday relationships. By accepting, delighting in, and loving others, we are fulfilling the essence of what Jesus instructed: to love unconditionally and without judgment.

The Great Commandment


Bishop Robert Barron's homily for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A focuses on loving what God loves, as per the Gospel reading Matthew 22:34-40. Using his experience of visiting President Reagan's ranch, he illustrates how Nancy Reagan loved the simple ranch because her husband did. He argues that the core Christian message is to love God fully and, in doing so, love what God loves, including those who are most in need. This notion echoes Exodus 22:20-26 and 1 Thessalonians 1:5-10, which also emphasize kindness to the marginalized. Barron suggests that love for God should compel us to extend love to everyone, especially the poor and needy.

Love Commanded

Scott Hahn's reflection for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A focuses on Jesus' teaching that love is the fulfillment of the Old Testament law. According to Jesus, all 613 commands in the Bible's first five books can be summarized by love for God and neighbor. This love is not mere sentiment; it requires full commitment to God and concrete actions towards neighbors. Love acts as the binding factor between the two sets of laws engraved on the stone tablets: love for God and love for neighbor. The reflection underscores that this love is a response to God's first loving us and providing salvation. It advocates living a life of continual sacrifice as an expression of this love.

The Law of Israel

In this homily for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Bishop Robert Barron focuses on how Israelite identity in the Old Testament is formed by three sets of laws: liturgical, ritual, and moral. In modern Catholicism, the liturgical laws are incorporated and ritual laws are largely sidelined, while moral laws remain unchanged. These moral laws, rooted in the natural law, continue to shape our ethical understanding. The homily cites various passages from the Bible to argue that while the liturgical and moral laws have been integrated into modern Catholic teaching, the ritual laws have been largely set aside. The moral laws, however, are still relevant and serve as foundational principles for ethical behavior.

More Thoughts for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Old Rules for Fair Treatment

The first reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A outlines some of the social justice laws in ancient Israel. It specifically talks about the mistreatment of foreigners, widows, and orphans, as well as lending practices. The underlying theme is one of empathy and ethical treatment of vulnerable populations.

The instruction to not mistreat or oppress a foreigner has modern relevance in discussions around immigration or minority rights. Similarly, the call to look after widows and orphans can extend to any marginalized or vulnerable group today. We must take care of people who are easily taken advantage of.

These ancient laws can guide our modern sense of social justice. Ensuring fair treatment of all, regardless of social standing, and applying ethical standards to financial and social systems, aren't just ancient religious tenets; they’re practical guidelines for creating a more equitable society today.

Actions Matter

In the second reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Paul writes a letter to the Thessalonians. He praises them for their strong faith and says they are good examples for others. The message of the gospel is spreading not just by talking, but also through real belief and changed actions.

Paul says it's not just about words but also about actions that make a difference. In today's dital world, words are easy to find but they often don't do much. This tells us that actions and true belief are important if we want to really communicate.

The main point is that actions matter, not just words. How we act should show our love for God and for other people.

Love and Compassion

The readings for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A emphasize the imperative to love and show compassion to others, especially those who are vulnerable or marginalized. In Exodus, God instructs the Israelites not to mistreat foreigners, widows, or orphans and to lend to those in need without interest. In Matthew, Jesus sums up the law with the two greatest commandments: love God and love your neighbor.

The laws which God gave to Israel were meant to protect the vulnerable: widows, orphans, foreigners. They were meant to alleviate suffering, and to remind the Isrealites that they had also suffered and that God had rescued them. Jesus points out that the many laws were all contained in "Love God" and "Love your neighbor." This is the point of these precepts. The word used for love is "agape" which is more than just a feeling of friendship or affection. It is a love committed to action.

Both passages remind us that our ethical and spiritual responsibilities are interconnected. Loving God is closely tied to how we treat others. So we are also called to love the marginalized in our world. And we must not just love them by thinking well of them. We are called to action.

Reflection Questions for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 25, 2026

  • How do the social justice laws outlined in Exodus relate to your understanding of current social issues, such as immigration or minority rights?
  • In what ways do you think the call to look after widows and orphans can extend to today's marginalized groups? Who needs my help in the world today?
  • Do you agree that ancient religious tenets can serve as practical guidelines for modern society? Why or why not?
  • Paul emphasizes actions over words in his letter to the Thessalonians. How does this message resonate with you in the context of today's digital world?
  • What specific actions can you take to demonstrate your love for God and neighbor, as outlined in Matthew's Gospel?
  • How do you interpret the use of the word "agape" for love in the Biblical context? How does this understanding influence your day-to-day actions?
  • Can you think of a time when you were challenged to put your love for God into action by helping someone vulnerable or marginalized? What did you learn from that experience?
  • How can you balance the call to action in your faith life with the practicalities and limitations of your everyday life?
  • What action have I taken lately to love my neighbors? Do I consider all people my neighbors, even those I have strong disagreements with?
  • In your opinion, how are your ethical and spiritual responsibilities interconnected?
  • What steps can you take to better align your actions with the teachings from these readings?

Quotes and Social Media Graphics for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

If you use the images below in any form, you must provide attribution to young-catholics.com. See details.

son of the most high 1
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You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and the first commandment.
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.
30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A
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Love is a theme for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Music Suggestions for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 25, 2026

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Sunday October 25, 2026.
For other years see the links below:
30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year B: Sunday October 27, 2024
30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C: Sunday October 26, 2025

What are the Mass readings for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A?

The Catholic Mass readings for Sunday October 25, 2026 are:
First Reading – Exodus 22:20-26: Compassion and Justice
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 18: Loving the Protector
Second Reading – 1 Thessalonians 1:5C-10: Imitators and Models
Gospel – Matthew 22:34-40: Greatest Commandments

What happens in Matthew 22:34-40, the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A?

A Pharisee asks Jesus which commandment is the greatest. Jesus responds that the greatest commandment is to love God with all your heart, soul, and mind. The second greatest is to love your neighbor as yourself. He adds that all the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.

What Are the themes for the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A?

The main themes in Matthew 22:34-40 are the primacy of love in religious and ethical life, and the simplification of the multitude of laws and guidelines into two fundamental principles.

What are the two greatest commandments according to the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Matthew 22:34-40)?

The first is to love God with all your heart, soul, and mind. The second, akin to the first, is to love your neighbor as yourself.

How do these commandments in the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Matthew 22:34-40) relate to existing laws and prophets?

Jesus says these two commandments encapsulate the essence of all law and the teachings of the prophets.

Why does Jesus choose these two commandments in the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Matthew 22:34-40)?

Jesus distills the essence of the religious law into these two commandments to show that love—for God and for fellow humans—is the core of ethical behavior. These two principles serve as a basis for all other rules and regulations.

What does it mean that "all the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments" in the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Matthew 22:34-40)?

It signifies that these two principles of love are the foundation for understanding and applying all other religious and moral guidelines. In essence, if one follows these two commandments, the rest will naturally follow.

How can the gospel for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A be applied to everyday life?

The message is straightforward: prioritize love. Loving God and loving your neighbors are the cornerstones of a balanced, ethical life. This can serve as a guiding principle in decision-making, in how we treat others, and in how we conduct ourselves in various life situations.

What does the first reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A say about treating marginalized groups?

Exodus 22:20-26 explicitly states not to oppress aliens, widows, or orphans. If their cries reach God, those oppressing them will face divine wrath.

What's the guideline in the first reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Exodus 22:20-26) about lending to the poor?

Lenders are instructed not to charge interest to poor neighbors. Also, any items pledged for a loan, like cloaks, should be returned before sunset.

What roles does the Lord play according to the responsorial psalm for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Psalm 18)?

The Lord is depicted as strength, rock, and deliverer. He provides safety from enemies and blesses the psalmist.

What does the responsorial psalm for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (Psalm 18) say about God's attributes?

God is praised for delivering victories and showing kindness. This highlights His dual role as both a powerful protector and a compassionate benefactor.

How are the Thessalonians described in their faith journey in the second reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (1 Thessalonians 1:5C-10)?

They are described as models for believers, having received the word even in hardship. They have turned from idols to serve the living God.

What impact has the Thessalonians' faith had according to the second reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A (1 Thessalonians 1:5C-10)?

Their faith has become widely recognized and serves as an example for other believers far and wide.

What overarching theme emerges about love and compassion in the readings for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A?

Across the readings, the recurring theme is about love, compassion, and justice—whether it's God's love for us, our required love for God, or the compassion and fairness we must extend to others.

How can the teachings from these readings for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A be applied today?

The readings offer a template for ethical living: prioritize compassion, fair treatment of others, and sincere love for God. These principles are as applicable today as they were in biblical times.

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