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Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years. When this falls on October 2, the gospel for the Memorial of the Guardian Angels is used.

  • First Reading (Cycle 1) – Zechariah 8:1-8: The Lord promises to return to Zion and make Jerusalem a city of faithfulness. Elderly people and children will populate its streets. Despite seeming impossible, God vows to bring his people back.
  • First Reading (Cycle 2) – Job 1:6-22: Satan challenges Job’s faithfulness, claiming he’s loyal because he’s blessed. God allows Satan to take Job’s possessions and children but not harm him. Despite his losses, Job remains faithful and doesn’t curse God.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 102: The LORD will rebuild Zion and appear gloriously, listening to the prayers of the destitute. Future generations will praise Him, and people will gather in Jerusalem to serve the LORD.
  • Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 17: I call upon the LORD for a just judgment, confident in my sincerity. Though tested, I remain faithful, and ask God to show mercy and provide refuge against my enemies.
  • Gospel Luke 9:46-50: Jesus corrects his disciples’ focus on being the greatest by using a child as a lesson in humility. He also instructs not to hinder those doing good in his name.

Themes for the Daily Mass Readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time

  • Dispute Over Greatness: The disciples argue about who among them is the greatest. This theme delves into human tendencies towards competitiveness and status within a group.
  • Humility Illustrated: Jesus uses a child to make a point about humility and openness. The child serves as a symbol of these virtues, contrasting the disciples’ debate about greatness.
  • Inclusivity Over Exclusivity: The disciples try to stop an outsider from casting out demons in Jesus’ name. Jesus corrects them, emphasizing that those who aren’t against them are for them. This theme promotes a more inclusive view of spiritual community.

Whoever receives this child in my name receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me. For the one who is least among all of you is the one who is the greatest.

Luke 9:46

Reflection for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time

In the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time, Luke 9:46-50, the disciples argue about who is the greatest among them, and Jesus uses a child to teach a lesson about humility and inclusivity. He also addresses the notion of who is ‘for’ or ‘against’ him. Several key points emerge for contemporary Catholics.

First, the argument among the disciples reveals the human tendency to seek status and recognition, even in religious settings. This serves as a caution for today’s Catholics about the dangers of ego and pride within religious communities. The focus should be on serving others rather than seeking personal glory.

Second, Jesus uses a child to illustrate his point about greatness being tied to humility and service. This could be a nudge for modern Catholics to reevaluate their criteria for what constitutes ‘greatness.’ It’s not about prominence or power, but humility and a willingness to serve.

Third, Jesus’ openness to someone casting out demons in his name, even if they’re not among his immediate followers, speaks to inclusivity. This is relevant today as it cautions against a narrow or exclusive view of who can do good or who belongs in the community of believers.

Fourth, the phrase “Whoever is not against you is for you” provides a broader perspective on alliances and shared goals. For contemporary Catholics, this can translate into a more open and collaborative approach, especially when dealing with individuals or groups who may not fully align with Catholic teachings but share common aims, like social justice issues.

In summary, Luke 9:46-50 offers valuable insights on humility, the true measure of greatness, inclusivity, and collaborative action. These principles can guide Catholics in both personal growth and community interactions.

Prayer for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time

Lord Jesus, root out any pride or sense of superiority that may dwell in our hearts. Teach us to be humble and to celebrate the good done in Your name, regardless of who accomplishes it. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections

Word on Fire: Childlike Authenticity in Discipleship

In this reflection for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time, Bishop Robert Barron discusses Jesus presenting a child as the ideal disciple in contrast to his followers, who are preoccupied with their own significance. While Jesus advocates for selflessness and sacrifice as shown through his impending crucifixion, his disciples are concerned with ego and status. A child, straightforward and without pretense, serves as the antidote to this adult egocentrism. Jesus identifies with the child’s genuine nature to emphasize that authenticity and selflessness are central to his teachings, which is likely why this narrative appears in all synoptic Gospels.

USCCB Reflection: The True Measure of Greatness

This USCCB video reflection for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time discusses how greatness isn’t measured by accomplishments or control, but by being humble and offering service and love to others. Drawing on lessons from both Jackie Gleason’s comedy and the teachings of Jesus, it emphasizes that true happiness comes from giving, not receiving.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time?

The next date is Monday September 30, 2024.

What are the Mass readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time?

The Mass readings for Monday September 30, 2024 are:
First Reading (Cycle 1) – Zechariah 8:1-8: Jerusalem’s Restoration
First Reading (Cycle 2) – Job 1:6-22: Job’s Trials
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 1) – Psalm 102: Rebuilding Zion
Responsorial Psalm (Cycle 2) – Psalm 17: A Righteous Plea
Gospel – Luke 9:46-50: True Greatness
When this falls on October 2, the gospel for the Memorial of the Guardian Angels is used.
See the readings section of this page for a longer summary of these readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time and links to the readings.

What happens in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50)?

The disciples argue about who among them is the greatest. Jesus, aware of their discussion, brings a child beside him to illustrate that greatness in the Kingdom of God is about humility and welcoming the least among us. Then, John mentions they saw someone casting out demons in Jesus’ name and stopped him because he wasn’t a follower. Jesus tells them not to stop him, for whoever is not against them is for them.

What are the themes for the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time?

The themes in the gospel, Luke 9:46-50, include the redefinition of greatness, the importance of humility, and the inclusive nature of doing good. Jesus challenges conventional notions of status and power, advocating instead for humility and inclusivity.
See the themes section of this page for more themes for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time. A reflection, prayer, and homily links are also available.

What lesson does Jesus teach using a child in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50)?

Jesus uses a child to teach his disciples about the importance of humility over seeking greatness.

Why does Jesus use a child as an example in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50)?

In the cultural context, a child was seen as low in status and without social power. By using a child as an example, Jesus is emphasizing that greatness in his kingdom is not about social standing but about humility and openness to all.

What does Jesus say about those doing good in his name in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50)?

Jesus advises not to hinder those doing good in his name, emphasizing inclusion and common purpose.

What is the significance of the person casting out demons in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50)?

The mention of this person highlights the idea that doing good isn’t exclusive to a particular group. Jesus uses this to teach a lesson on inclusivity: the person who isn’t against you is for you.

What is the key lesson in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50)?

The Gospel stresses humility and inclusivity. Jesus uses a child to teach the disciples about the importance of being humble and warns against preventing others who are doing good in his name.

How can this notion of humility in the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50) be applied today?

Be open to learning from unlikely sources and avoid feeling superior to others. Recognize and appreciate the good deeds of people, even if they don’t belong to your inner circle.

How is the gospel for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time (Luke 9:46-50) relevant to everyday life?

The passage prompts us to reconsider how we define greatness, advocating for a shift towards valuing humility and inclusivity. It suggests that the capacity for doing good extends beyond our immediate circles and that we should be open to acknowledging and supporting good deeds, irrespective of their source.

What does God promise for the future of Jerusalem in the first reading for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Zechariah 8:1-8)?

God promises to return to Zion, making Jerusalem a city of faithfulness filled with elderly people and children.

How can this message from the first reading for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Zechariah 8:1-8) apply today?

It tells us to maintain hope and faithfulness, even when things seem difficult or impossible.

What is the central message of the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 102)?

God will rebuild Zion, listen to the prayers of the needy, and future generations will praise Him.

What does the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 (Psalm 102) imply about prayer?

It emphasizes that God listens to even the most destitute, reinforcing the universality of divine compassion.

What themes connect the readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Common themes include faithfulness, hope, humility, and divine compassion.

How can these readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 be applied in everyday life?

They encourage us to be faithful, hopeful, and humble, and to trust that God listens to everyone, regardless of their status.

What’s the main message of the first reading for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Job 1:6-22) ?

Job’s story begins with a test of his faithfulness. Despite losing nearly everything, Job remains loyal to God, showing that his faith is not contingent on his blessings.

How can the first reading for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Job 1:6-22) apply to people going through tough times?

It suggests that faithfulness should not depend solely on good circumstances. Those experiencing hardships can draw inspiration from Job’s unwavering faith.

What themes are highlighted in the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 17) ?

The Psalm focuses on seeking justice and divine protection. It speaks to maintaining faithfulness and integrity even when going through trials.

How can people integrate the message of the responsorial psalm for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 17) in daily life?

One can seek justice through ethical actions and rely on faith as a moral compass. It’s about staying true to your convictions and asking for divine guidance in difficult times.

What common thread runs through these readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 17)?

The readings focus on the virtues of faithfulness and humility. Whether facing hardships like Job or navigating interpersonal dynamics like the disciples, the importance of sticking to these virtues is emphasized.

What are some actionable steps to embody these virtues from readings for Monday of the 26th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2 (Psalm 17)?

Maintain a steady spiritual practice to bolster faith, especially in difficult times. Practice humility by acknowledging others’ contributions and avoiding ego-driven conflicts. Keep an ethical framework that guides your interactions and choices.

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