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Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time

Daily Mass Readings for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

  • First ReadingHebrews 12:1-4: Surrounded by faithful witnesses, let’s shed hindrances and sin, running our life’s race with endurance, eyes fixed on Jesus, our faith’s initiator and perfecter, who endured the cross for eternal joy.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 22: The humble and seekers of the Lord will find joy and fulfillment. All nations will turn to and worship Him. Future generations will learn of His righteousness and deeds.
  • Gospel Mark 5:21-43: In a crowd, Jairus, a synagogue leader, begged Jesus to heal his dying daughter. As Jesus proceeded, a woman with chronic bleeding touched his cloak and was instantly healed. Jesus commended her faith. Arriving at Jairus’s house, despite hearing of the girl’s death, Jesus revived her, astounding all present.

Jesus, aware at once that power had gone out from him, turned around in the crowd and asked, “Who has touched my clothes?”

Mark 5:30

Themes for the Readings for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

For Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, the readings present several interwoven themes:

  • Faith and Perseverance: In Hebrews 12:1-4, the emphasis on running our life’s race with endurance, while keeping our eyes on Jesus, highlights the importance of persistent faith and perseverance in the Christian journey. This theme is echoed in the Gospel reading (Mark 5:21-43), where both Jairus and the woman with chronic bleeding demonstrate deep faith and perseverance in seeking Jesus’ help.
  • Jesus as the Source of Healing and Salvation: The Gospel account illustrates Jesus’ power to heal and bring life. The healing of the woman and the raising of Jairus’s daughter underscore Jesus’ role as the divine healer and savior, bringing physical and spiritual restoration.
  • The Power of Humble Faith: The readings bring out the power of humble and trusting faith. The woman in the Gospel story, though marginalized, shows great faith in Jesus, just by touching His cloak. This humble act of faith leads to her healing, illustrating how faith, even in its simplest form, can be powerful.
  • Witness and Testimony: The first reading talks about being “surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses.” This idea is about drawing strength and inspiration from those who have faithfully walked before us. In the Gospel, the witnesses to Jesus’ miracles become bearers of His power and mercy, called to share what they have seen and experienced.
  • Universal Call to Salvation: Psalm 22 speaks of all nations turning to worship God. This universal aspect of salvation is a reminder of the inclusive nature of God’s call, extending beyond any single group or nation.
  • Overcoming Doubt with Trust in God: In the Gospel, Jesus tells Jairus, “Do not fear, only believe,” even when news of his daughter’s death arrives. This highlights the theme of overcoming doubt and fear by placing trust in God.
  • Impact of Jesus’ Actions on Future Generations: The Responsorial Psalm’s mention of future generations learning of the Lord’s righteousness and deeds connects with the Gospel’s demonstration of Jesus’ miraculous works, implying that these actions will be remembered and shared across generations, inspiring faith and devotion.

These themes for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 are rich in meaning and offer various angles for reflection, discussion, and application in the context of personal faith, community life, and broader societal engagement.

Thoughts for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

In the Gospel reading for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, we encounter two miraculous healings performed by Jesus, offering a profound insight into the nature of faith and God’s compassionate response to it. This narrative, set alongside the day’s other readings from Hebrews and Psalms, provides a multi-faceted reflection on faith’s journey, its challenges, and its ultimate fulfillment in Christ.

Mark 5:21-43 tells the story of Jairus, a synagogue leader, and an unnamed woman suffering from chronic bleeding. Both are desperate for Jesus’ healing touch, yet their approaches are markedly different. Jairus, a respected community figure, publicly pleads with Jesus to save his dying daughter. In contrast, the woman, marginalized by her condition, silently reaches out to touch Jesus’ cloak, believing this alone will heal her. Their stories converge to teach us about the nature of faith: one that is humble, persistent, and deeply personal.

The woman’s faith is particularly striking. Suffering for twelve years, she embodies endurance, a theme echoed in the first reading from Hebrews 12:1-4. Here, we are urged to “run with endurance the race that is set before us,” looking to Jesus as our guide and inspiration. The woman’s quiet yet determined faith mirrors this call. In her, we see a faith that endures despite social isolation and continuous suffering, a faith that reaches its fulfillment in a simple, hopeful touch.

Jairus’s faith, too, is a testament to perseverance. Faced with the devastating news of his daughter’s death, he is urged by Jesus to “not fear, only believe.” This moment encapsulates the essence of faith confronted by despair. Jesus’ words to Jairus resonate with every believer who has stood at the crossroads of hope and hopelessness. Faith, as shown here, is not passive; it is a dynamic, living trust in God’s power even in the face of life’s most painful realities.

The Gospel account culminates in the restoration of life – both in the woman healed of her affliction and Jairus’s daughter raised from death. This is where the Gospel intersects with the Responsorial Psalm, Psalm 22, which speaks of a God who is attentive to the needs of the suffering and the humble. It is a reminder that faith’s journey is not solitary; it is deeply connected to the community of believers and to God’s faithful response.

In Hebrews, we are reminded that we are surrounded by a “great cloud of witnesses.” This notion connects seamlessly with the Gospel story, where the witnesses to Jesus’ miracles are not mere bystanders but participants in the unfolding of God’s salvific plan. They are called to bear witness to faith made visible in action, to a hope that materializes in the midst of despair.

As we reflect on these readings for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, we are invited to examine the nature of our own faith. Are we willing to reach out in hope, even when the odds seem against us? Can we trust in Jesus’ words, “Do not fear, only believe,” in our moments of despair? The Gospel challenges us to embrace a faith that is humble yet bold, silent yet powerful – a faith that endures and transforms.

In the ordinary days of our lives, these extraordinary stories of faith remind us that each day is an opportunity to live out our faith with perseverance, looking to Jesus as our ultimate guide and healer.

Prayer

Heavenly Father, grant us humility and courage. May our faith be steadfast and trusting in Your healing touch. Strengthen us to endure our trials with grace, keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus, our Savior and guide. Amen.

Homilies and Reflections
for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

Word on Fire: Jesus’ Assault on Death

In Bishop Robert Barron’s reflection for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1, he discusses the Gospel story of Jesus raising Jairus’s daughter. Barron emphasizes Jesus’ challenge to the culture of death and his assertion that death is not final, illustrated by Jesus telling Jairus, “Do not be afraid; just have faith.” This narrative underscores the central theme of resurrection in Jesus’ teachings, portraying God as the Lord and giver of life who combats the forces of death. The phrase “Talitha koum” symbolizes this triumph over death and the transformative power of faith over fear.

USCCB Reflection: Facing Fear with Faith

This USCCB video reflection for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 discusses the Gospel passage, where Jesus performs two miracles: raising a dead girl and healing a woman considered ritually unclean. The key message is Jesus’ transcending of life, death, and religious norms, emphasized by his words “Do not be afraid; just have faith.” The reflection connects this advice to personal experiences of fear and uncertainty, particularly in life-and-death situations. It invites us to internalize Jesus’ words in our daily challenges, encouraging faith to prevail over fear and anxiety in all aspects of life.

Frequently Asked Questions
for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1

What date is Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The next date is Tuesday February 4, 2025.

Cycle 1 is used in odd numbered years and Cycle 2 is used in even numbered years. The gospel is the same for both years. For even numbered years see Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 2.

What are the Mass readings for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The Mass readings for Tuesday February 4, 2025 are:
First Reading  – Hebrews 12:1-4: Perseverance in Faith
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 22: Universal Praise for the Lord
Gospel – Mark 5:21-43: Healing and Resurrection

What are the key themes for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

The key themes include faith and perseverance, Jesus as the source of healing and salvation, the power of humble faith, witness and testimony, universal call to salvation, and overcoming doubt with trust in God.

How does the first reading from Hebrews 12:1-4 relate to the Gospel for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Hebrews 12:1-4 emphasizes perseverance and faith, themes mirrored in the Gospel where both Jairus and the bleeding woman demonstrate persistent faith in Jesus.

What can we learn from the woman with chronic bleeding in the Gospel for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

We learn about the strength of humble and silent faith, and how even the smallest acts of faith, like touching Jesus’ cloak, can lead to profound healing and transformation.

Who was Jairus in the Gospel reading for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Jairus was a synagogue leader who approached Jesus to heal his dying daughter, demonstrating his faith and desperation for Jesus’ intervention.

What is the significance of Jesus’ words, “Do not fear, only believe,” in the context of Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

These words highlight the importance of maintaining faith and trust in God, even in the face of fear and seemingly hopeless situations.

How does Psalm 22 complement the readings for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1?

Psalm 22 emphasizes the joy and fulfillment found in seeking the Lord, resonating with the themes of faith and divine response in the other readings.

What lessons about healing can be drawn from Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 readings?

The readings teach that healing is not only physical but also spiritual, and that it often comes through faith, perseverance, and Jesus’ compassionate response.

How can the story of Jairus’s daughter from the Gospel for Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 inspire believers today?

This story inspires believers to have faith in Jesus’ power to bring life and hope, even in situations that seem beyond help.

What message does Tuesday of the 4th Week in Ordinary Time Cycle 1 convey about facing challenges in life?

The message is to approach life’s challenges with faith and endurance, looking to Jesus as the perfecter of our faith and the source of our strength.

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