Why Go for A Quiet Walk and Pray?

If you are looking for a new springtime prayer routine, try to go for a short quiet walk each day and pray. This can be a time to speak to God and even more so to allow God to speak to you. So consider going on a 30 minute walk as a Lenten activity.

Many people like to move and be active. So this active sort of prayer works well for people who find it difficult to sit and pray.

Tips for Walking and Praying

Turn off the music and go for a quiet walk in silence. This is an especially powerful experience for teenagers, who have a lot of noise and distraction in their lives.

Consider walking in a local park instead of on the sidewalk along the street. This allows you to be aware of the silence and not distracted by the sound of cars. Just let whatever is on your mind bubble up to the top. After about 5 minutes, you can usually tell what is on my mind. And then just talk to God about it. If appropriate, and if you can clear your head, do some discernment about how to handle the issue.

And some days there might not be a big problem on your mind. On those days just become aware of the birds singing, or the breeze on your skin, or the beauty of a falling leaf. Then give thanks to God for the wonder of that moment.

Related Ideas

Learn a New Prayer

It is good to keep your prayer life fresh by trying a new type of prayer from time to time. While just sitting and listening or doing something a little less structured like Lectio Divina are very helpful, sometimes there are times when a traditional prayer bring comfort and inspiration.

Go to a Prayer Labyrinth

A prayer labyrinth is a circle with a path in it which you walk while you pray. The purpose of the labyrinth is to facilitate prayer.  Catholic retreat centers often have prayer labyrinths on their grounds. They can be really effective for some youth with Autism or ADHD.

Walking Can Be an Entrance into Prayer

Read more about how walking and praying go together. “Just walking to a nearby shop can be a small pilgrimage—inhaling the smell of the day, getting a glimpse of life in other houses, pausing to admire how a building has suddenly been gilded by the late-afternoon light.”


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