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29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 18, 2026

Mass Readings for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

  • First ReadingIsaiah 45:1, 4-6: The LORD empowers Cyrus for Israel's sake. Even though Cyrus doesn't recognize the LORD, God uses him to show there's no other God besides Him.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 96: All lands should sing to the LORD and share his marvelous deeds. He surpasses all gods and created the heavens. All nations should honor him, and recognize his just rule.
  • Second Reading1 Thessalonians 1:1-5B: Paul, Silvanus, and Timothy greet the Thessalonians, offering thanks for their faith, love, and hope. They emphasize the gospel's powerful delivery, beyond just words, through the Holy Spirit.
  • Gospel - Matthew 22:15-21: The Pharisees tried to trap Jesus with a question about taxes to Caesar. Jesus, seeing through their intent, responded wisely, indicating to give Caesar his due and God what's His.

Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God.

Matthew 22:21

Themes for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

The readings for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time for Year A speak of allegiance and responsibility. From the first reading we understand that we must give our whole selves to God. The psalm echoes this with “Give the Lord glory and honor.” The second reading speaks of how we are called and chosen to do the work of Christ. And in the gospel, Jesus explains that we must give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God.

  • Trap for Jesus: The Pharisees and Herodians attempt to entrap Jesus with a question about taxes. This theme highlights the continuous efforts by religious leaders to discredit Jesus.
  • Render to Caesar: Jesus’ response about giving to Caesar what is Caesar's and to God what is God's provides a distinction between civic and religious duties. This theme touches on the balance between secular and spiritual obligations.
  • Wisdom over Deception: Jesus discerns the malicious intent behind the question and responds wisely, avoiding the trap. This theme underscores Jesus' ability to navigate challenging situations with insight.
  • Image and Ownership: Jesus uses the coin's image to discuss ownership, implying that just as the coin bears Caesar’s image, humans, made in God's image, belong to Him.

See the Homilies and Reflections section and the More Thoughts section for further expansion on these readings and some reflection questions for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A.

Resources for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Caesar Vs God A Lesson Plan on Citizenship
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Caesar Vs. God – A Lesson Plan on Citizenship

This lesson plan deals with the topic of Caesar vs. God and focuses on the concept of citizenship from a Catholic perspective. The gospel for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, specifically Matthew 22:15-21, expresses this theme. The Pharisees ask Jesus about paying taxes to Caesar. Jesus shows a coin, asks whose image is on it, and when they say "Caesar's," he replies, "Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s." Both the lesson plan and the gospel highlight the idea of dual responsibilities: one to earthly authorities and another to God. The key takeaway is to recognize and fulfill our duties in both realms, without compromising our primary allegiance to God.

Suscipe Prayer (Take Lord Receive Prayer)

The Suscipe Prayer emphasizes a complete surrender to God's will, essentially offering everything one has to Him In Matthew 22:15-21, the gospel for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, resonates with the theme of discerning between worldly and divine responsibilities. Both the Suscipe Prayer and this gospel passage highlight the necessity of recognizing what belongs to God and committing oneself fully to Him, while also fulfilling earthly duties.

A Song to God – A Prayer Based on Psalm 96

The responsorial psalm for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A is Psalm 96, a call to worship and proclaim God's glory among the nations. This prayer is directly based on Psalm 96. The prayer captures the essence of the psalm by echoing its themes of praise, worship, and acknowledgment of God's might and justice. In essence, the prayer serves as a modern reflection, helping contemporary readers engage deeply with the ancient text of Psalm 96 and its enduring message.

The Book of Isaiah
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The Book of Isaiah

The book of Isaiah offers prophetic messages, some of which spotlight the sovereignty of God over all nations. In the first reading for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Isaiah 45:1, 4-6, God's appointment of Cyrus, a non-Israelite king, demonstrates this universal dominion. The passage acknowledges Cyrus as an instrument of God's purpose, despite him not knowing God. This theme aligns with the broader content of Isaiah, which often emphasizes the Lord's omnipotence and His plan that surpasses human understanding. The text illustrates that God can work through anyone or any situation, reminding readers of His active presence and influence in the broader world beyond just the Israelite community.

the gospel of matthew
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Resources for the Gospel of Matthew

Matthew's Gospel consistently presents Jesus teaching about the Kingdom of Heaven and the demands of discipleship. In the gospel for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Matthew 22:15-21, when questioned about paying taxes to Caesar, Jesus responds with the famous line, "Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's." This narrative ties into the Gospel's overarching theme of balancing earthly responsibilities with spiritual ones. As conveyed in various passages, living according to Jesus’ teachings necessitates discerning the right actions in both the temporal and spiritual realms. The challenge lies in navigating worldly duties while staying committed to one's faith and spiritual obligations.

Homilies and Reflections for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 18, 2026

Jeff Cavins delves into the gospel for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, where Jesus is questioned about paying taxes. This reflection underscores that, unlike coins with Caesar's image, humans bear the divine image of God, indicating their deeper allegiance to Him. Cavins further emphasizes that as humans, created in God's likeness, should wholly commit to Him, giving their bodies, minds, and spirits. Referencing the Catechism, Cavins notes that worshiping one true God frees individuals from worldly complexities. For the week, he challenges listeners to remember their divine image whenever they encounter monetary images.

Caesar and the King

Scott Hahn reflects on the readings for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A. God has always influenced earthly rulers, even those unaware of Him. Using the example of King Cyrus, whom God employed to assist the Israelites, Hahn emphasizes that worldly governments and powers, like the Roman occupation during Jesus' time, operate under God's plan. When Jesus mentions repaying Caesar, it's a reminder that while citizens should respect and obey government, their ultimate loyalty belongs to God. The coin may carry Caesar's image, but humans are crafted in God's image. Thus, we owe everything to God and must prioritize His teachings, even when they clash with earthly laws.

Caesar and God

In this homily for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Bishop Robert Barron discusses the delicate balance between religious beliefs and political allegiances, referencing Jesus' statement about giving to Caesar what belongs to him and to God what is His. Barron emphasizes that while there is a distinction between church and state, in the broader perspective, everything, including the state, is ultimately under God's domain.

Truth Cannot Always Take Sides

(Note: the audio for the gospel reading is poor, but once the homily starts it is clear.)

In this homily for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Fr. Richard Rohr discusses the pitfalls of "either or" thinking, emphasizing that people often feel validated when they pick a side. Using the gospel as an example, he highlights Jesus' approach to not firmly siding with either group, suggesting that true faith requires embracing ambiguity and not always seeking definite answers.

More Thoughts for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Dynamic Faith

In the second reading for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5B, Paul, Silvanus, and Timothy address the Church of the Thessalonians, offering gratitude for their faith and love. Their faith wasn't merely expressed in words; it manifested in deeds and in the power of the Holy Spirit. The passage sheds light on the quality of genuine faith. It's not passive or hidden. True faith actively engages with the world, demonstrated through love for others and enduring hope in Jesus Christ.

Moreover, Paul emphasizes the role of the Holy Spirit. It's a reminder that faith is not solely a human endeavor. It's a partnership with the divine. The Holy Spirit emboldens us, assures us, and is the source of our conviction. The chosenness of the Thessalonians is also significant. They weren't just believers; they were chosen by God. This underlines the Catholic teaching of divine grace – we come to faith not just by our efforts but by God's initiative.

This passage invites Catholics to introspect: Is our faith active and dynamic? Do our actions affirm our beliefs? It's a call to live faith authentically, anchored in the Holy Spirit, and to recognize God's role in drawing us closer to Him.

Who Do We Belong To?

The gospel for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A, Matthew 22:15-21, presents a scenario where the Pharisees tried to trap Jesus with a question about taxes. They asked if it was right to pay taxes to Caesar. Jesus' response was both astute and revealing: "Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's." This interaction highlights a distinct separation between earthly obligations and spiritual commitments. Paying taxes, as unpleasant as it might be, is an earthly duty. It's a part of living in a society, and everyone must contribute.

However, Jesus' answer also alludes to a deeper truth. While we owe certain things to our governments or leaders, our ultimate allegiance is to God. Everything we are and everything we have originates from Him.

This passage challenges us to consider where our true loyalties lie. It reminds us that while we have duties in this world, our primary duty is to our Creator. Balancing our earthly and spiritual commitments is key, but remembering to whom we ultimately belong provides clarity in decision-making and action. We belong to God.

Genuine Faith and Authentic Living

The readings for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A address the theme of authenticity in living out one's beliefs. In the second reading, Paul acknowledges the genuine faith of the Thessalonians, evidenced by their actions powered by the Holy Spirit. In the gospel, Jesus highlights the importance of authentic living by delineating the boundaries of earthly and spiritual commitments.

These passages prompt readers to question the sincerity of their own actions. Are they merely performing rote religious rituals? Or are they, like the Thessalonians, allowing the Holy Spirit to guide their actions, leading to genuine love and steadfast hope? Jesus' interaction with the Pharisees is a clear call for authenticity. By asking them to "Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's," Jesus emphasizes the need to be genuine in both secular and spiritual duties without being hypocritical.

The connecting thread here is the call to lead an authentic life. It's about understanding and acknowledging our responsibilities in the secular world while ensuring our spiritual commitments aren't compromised. Both passages serve as reminders that genuine faith is evident in one's actions and that authenticity in all facets of life is paramount.

Reflection Questions for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

Sunday October 18, 2026
  • Paul speaks of faith being evident through actions. How do my actions align with my professed beliefs?
  • The role of the Holy Spirit is emphasized. How do I see the Holy Spirit guiding my daily decisions and interactions?
  • Paul mentions the Thessalonians being chosen by God. How do I understand my own "chosenness" in my faith journey?
  • Jesus differentiates between earthly and spiritual duties. How do I prioritize and balance my commitments to both?
  • Jesus' response to the Pharisees is a reminder of our ultimate allegiance to God. How do I ensure that my loyalties remain clear and unshaken in a world with many demands?
  • In what areas of my life do I feel I'm most genuine, and where might there be room for growth?
  • Do I see my possessions, time, and gifts as belonging to myself or to God? How does this perspective shape my actions?
  • Am I quick to take sides in conflicts or disputes? How do I relate to those on the "other side" and find common ground?
  • What specific aspect of my life or what challenge do I need to offer up to God today?
  • Drawing from Jesus' distinction of what belongs to Caesar and God, how do I discern what I owe to worldly commitments versus my spiritual ones?

Quotes and Social Media Graphics for the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A

If you use the images below in any form, you must provide attribution to young-catholics.com. See details.

I am the lord
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I am the LORD, there is no other. - Isaiah 45:6
29th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A
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Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God. - Matthew 22:21

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