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The Ascension of the Lord Year C

The Ascension of the Lord Resources for Year c

Traditionally the Ascension of Our Lord was held 40 days after Easter, falling on a Thursday. However in most dioceses in the United States, the observance of the Solemnity of the Ascension is moved to the following Sunday, superseding the 7th Sunday of Easter.

Resources for the Ascension of the Lord Year C

superpowers A Lesson Plan on being clothed in power

Superpowers (Courage)

This Superpowers lesson plan will help youth understand what it means to be clothed in power. Like the first disciples, we need the superpower of courage.

litany of the gifts of the holy spirit

Litany of the Gifts of the Holy Spirit

This prayer asks for the Gifts of the Holy Spirit. It is in the form of a litany, which is a prayer where there is a prompt and then a response.

paschal mystery Background Material

What Is the Paschal Mystery?

The Paschal Mystery is God’s plan for the salvation of mankind, as fulfilled in the passion, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ has shown us that death does not have the final word.

A Prayer to God Who Is Above All based on Psalm 47

A Prayer to God Who Is Above All

This is a prayer based on Psalm 47, which is the responsorial psalm for this Sunday.. This psalm praises God who is above all and who rules all.

Who Lives in Your World? – Discussion and Reflection Questions

This reflection encourages youth to think about what it means to spread the Gospel to “the whole world”.

Homilies and Reflections for the Ascension of the Lord Year C

The Ascension of the Lord

In this homily for the Ascension of the Lord Year C, Bishop Robert Barron comments that the feast of the Ascension is meant to awaken hope. In Jesus, risen from the dead and ascended to the right hand of the Father, our lowly human nature participates in the very life of God. In the light of the ascension, therefore, we are permitted to hope for a way of being, elevated and perfected beyond our imagining.

The Good News

Scott Hahn reflects that the story did not end with the empty tomb, or with Jesus’ appearances to the Apostles over the course of forty days. Jesus’ saving work will have a liturgical consummation. He is the great high priest, and He has still to ascend to the heavenly Jerusalem, there to celebrate the feast in the true Holy of Holies.

Reasons to Be Confident about the Historical Jesus

Everything about the Gospels has the feel of eyewitness testimony—of people on the ground at the actual time and having real knowledge of the actual political situation, culture, custom, and geography. And without the Resurrection, it would seem that we have an effect (the rise of Christianity) with no adequate cause.

More Thoughts for the Ascension of the Lord Year C

At some point after the resurrection, Christ stopped appearing to the disciples. Now the power of Christ works through us. We must carry on the mission of proclaiming the Good News.

All of the gospels tell of the ascension of our Lord. Luke gives the most detailed account. It is similar to the ascension of Elijah. Jewish tradition also points to the ascension of Abraham, Moses, and Isaiah. In these cases, these holy men are summoned to the throne of God through the power of God.

There is also the account in the Book of Daniel.

As the visions during the night continued, I saw coming with the clouds of heaven. One like a son of man. When he reached the Ancient of Days and was presented before him, he received dominion, splendor, and kingship; all nations, peoples and tongues will serve him. His dominion is an everlasting dominion that shall not pass away, his kingship, one that shall not be destroyed.

Daniel 7:13-14

The ascension of Jesus fulfills this prophecy. It is echoed in the words of St. Stephen, the first martyr:

He said, “Behold, I see the heavens opened and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God.”

Acts of the Apostles 7:56

There is also a parallel between the final words of Jesus and the words of the Angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary.

The holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you.

Luke 1:35 (The Annunciation)

You will receive power when the holy Spirit comes upon you.

Acts 1:8 (The Ascension)

So the ascension is the final event of the incarnation. And through Christ, we all will take our place with God. The same power which worked on our Blessed Mother to bring the incarnation to the world now works on the disciples. They will also bring Jesus Christ to the world.

Reflection Questions for the Ascension of the Lord Year C

  • How do I experience the risen Christ in my life?
  • Do I feel empowered to carry on the mission? How?
  • Is God summoning me to a higher state?

Quotes and Social Media Graphics for the Ascension of the Lord Year C

You will recieve power

It is not for you to know the times or seasons that the Father has established by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.

Frequently Asked Questions

What date is the Ascension of the Lord?

The next date is Sunday June 1, 2025.

Traditionally the Ascension of Our Lord was held 40 days after Easter, falling on a Thursday. However in most dioceses in the United States, the observance of the Solemnity of the Ascension is moved to the following Sunday, superseding the 7th Sunday of Easter.

For other years see the links below:
Ascension of the Lord Year A
Ascension of the Lord Year B

What are the Mass readings for the Ascension of the Lord Year C?

The Mass readings for Sunday June 1, 2025 are:

First Reading – Acts 1:1-11
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 47
Second Reading – Ephesians 1:17-23
Alternate Second Reading – Hebrews 9:24-28; 10:19-23
Gospel – Luke 24:46-53

What Are the themes for the Mass readings for the Ascension of the Lord Year C?

Evangelism
Going out to the world
Getting out of our comfort zones

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