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Corpus Christi Year A

Mass Readings for Corpus Christi Year A

  • First Reading Deuteronomy 8:2-3, 14B-16A: God led and tested the Israelites in the desert, providing manna and water, to show that life depends on His word.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 147: Praise the Lord for strengthening Jerusalem, granting peace, and sharing his word and laws with Israel.
  • Second Reading1 Corinthians 10:16-17: The cup and bread we bless signify our sharing in Christ’s blood and body, uniting us as one body.
  • Gospel John 6:51-58: Jesus declares He is the living bread from heaven. To have eternal life, we must eat His flesh and drink His blood, ensuring our union with Him and eternal life.

Themes for Corpus Christi Year A

This day is the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ.

The readings for Corpus Christi Year A focus on the Eucharist. We are reminded that God cared for the Israelites by providing manna. By receiving Holy Communion, we are spiritually fed and united in each other. And in the Gospel of John, Jesus makes it clear that the Eucharist is truly His body and blood, and gives us life.

  • Remembering God’s blessings: In the first reading for Corpus Christi Year A, the Israelites are reminded to remember how God led them through the wilderness and provided for them. This is a warning against forgetting God’s goodness and becoming prideful in our own abilities and possessions. We are called to recognize that all that we have comes from God, and we must be grateful for His provision.
  • Trusting in God’s word: The passage from Deuteronomy also emphasizes the importance of trusting in God’s word rather than material things. This is a call to focus on the spiritual rather than the material, recognizing that our true sustenance comes from God’s word. We must rely on God and His promises, rather than placing our trust in material things that will ultimately fade away.
  • The Eucharist as a sacrament of unity: The second reading for Corpus Christi Year A describes the Eucharist as a sacrament that creates a spiritual unity among believers. Through partaking in the bread and wine that represent the body and blood of Christ, we become united as one body of Christ. This is a reminder of the importance of community and the role that the Eucharist plays in creating a sense of belonging among believers.
  • The true presence of Christ in the Eucharist: The belief in the true presence of Christ in the bread and wine of the Eucharist is a central teaching of the Catholic Church. The second reading emphasizes that the bread and wine are not merely symbols, but are the body and blood of Christ. This belief is foundational to the Catholic faith, and is a reminder of the depth of Christ’s sacrifice for us.
  • The necessity of the Eucharist for eternal life: The Gospel reading from John emphasizes the necessity of consuming the body and blood of Christ for eternal life. Jesus teaches that His flesh and blood are true food and true drink, and those who eat and drink them will abide in Him and have eternal life. This is a reminder of the centrality of the Eucharist to the Catholic faith, and the importance of receiving the sacrament for our spiritual nourishment and growth.

See the Homilies and Reflections section and the More Thoughts section for further expansion on these readings and some reflection questions for Corpus Christi Year A.

Resources for Corpus Christi Year A

God Feeds His People – A Lesson Plan on Manna and Bread

This lesson plan on manna and bread relates to Corpus Christi Year A, as it highlights the importance of the Eucharist in sustaining us spiritually and creating a bond of unity among believers. Through the biblical accounts of God providing physical nourishment to His people, we are reminded of God’s generosity and His desire to care for us in all aspects of our lives. This lesson plan challenges us to reflect on the ways in which God feeds us, both through the Eucharist and in our daily lives, and to respond with gratitude and service to those in need.

Loaves and Fishes: Eucharist Lesson Plan

This Eucharist lesson plan is relevant to Corpus Christi Year A as it emphasizes the importance of the Eucharist in satisfying our spiritual needs. The lesson plan includes a game, Bible reading, discussion, and challenge for the youth to really approach the Eucharist through the eyes of faith. Through the story of the feeding of the multitude, the lesson plan highlights the mystery of the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist, encouraging the youth to spend time absorbing His love with their hearts.

What Does Amen Mean

What Does Amen Mean? Understanding the Significance of Amen in Response to the Eucharist for Catholic Youth

This reflection and discussion about the meaning of “Amen” when receiving the Body and Blood of Christ relates to Corpus Christi Year A in a significant way. During this feast, Catholics are reminded of the great mystery and gift of the Eucharist, which is the source and summit of the Christian life. This reflection helps youth to deepen their understanding of this mystery and to approach the Eucharist with reverence and faith, in line with the teachings of the Catholic Church.

litany of the blessed host adoration

Litany to the Blessed Host

The Litany to the Blessed Host, composed by Saint Faustina Kowalska, is a beautiful and poetic prayer that reflects her deep devotion to Jesus Christ in the Eucharist. The Litany to the Blessed Host is believed to have been written as a prayer to be recited in the presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist. For Corpus Christi Year A, this prayer can inspire us to deepen our own devotion to the Eucharist and to seek union with Christ in this sacrament.

Does It Last? A Timely Lesson Plan on the Eucharist

In Corpus Christi Year A, we are reminded that nothing in this world lasts forever, not even our possessions, activities, or lives. Instead, it is our relationship with God that truly matters. Jesus calls us to draw closer to Him, and He has given us the Eucharist as a precious gift to sustain us on our spiritual journey. Drawing from John 6:24-35, the lesson challenges students to prioritize the Eucharist by finding one thing they can do to deepen their connection with Christ.

the gospel of john

The Gospel of John

This background material on the Gospel of John provides important themes and teachings that are relevant to the celebration of Corpus Christi in Year A. The Gospel of John emphasizes the divinity of Jesus, the importance of belief in him for eternal life, the centrality of the Eucharist in Catholic worship, and the importance of love in Christian morality. These themes are central to the celebration of Corpus Christi, which commemorates the institution of the Eucharist by Jesus Christ. Understanding the theology presented in the Gospel of John is important for Catholics to deepen their faith and grow closer to God.

Homilies and Reflections for Corpus Christi Year A

Sunday June 7, 2026

Soul and Divinity

Jeff Cavins reflects on the readings for the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi Year A)

How the Eucharist Changed My Life

Why do less than 30% of Catholics believe in the Real Presence? It seems like many have forgotten that Jesus gave his flesh for the life of the world. Today, Fr. Mike Schmitz reminds us of the gift of the Eucharist and shares the way it transformed his own life. Think about this on Corpus Christi Year A.

Bread in the Desert

A homily from Bishop Robert Barron for Corpus Christi Year A. “All of us are on a spiritual journey from sin to salvation. Like the Israelites longing for a return to Egypt, many of us occasionally desire our old addictions, providing the anxious ego with comfort and security. Far from Egypt, the Promised Land is the spiritual space of complete dependence upon God. But the Israelites are not there yet. They need to eat the manna from heaven. For Catholics, this is the Eucharist. It is the means to getting God’s divine life within us.”

Word of the ‘Living Father’

A reflection for Corpus Christi Year A from Scott Hahn. “The Eucharist is given to us as a challenge and a promise. That’s how Jesus presents it in today’s Gospel. He doesn’t make it easy for those who hear Him. They are repulsed and offended at His words. Even when they begin to quarrel, He insists on describing the eating and drinking of His flesh and blood in starkly literal terms.” Continue reading.

Super Substantial Bread

Another homily for Corpus Christi Year A from Bishop Barron. This is the first celebration of Corpus Christi—the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ—after the Pew Forum study showing that 70% of Catholics don’t believe in the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. Vatican II said that the Eucharist is the source and the summit of the Christian life—so it is clear that something has gone seriously wrong. Therefore, it is with renewed interest and focus that we should look to the readings for today’s feast.

More Thoughts for Corpus Christi Year A

The Importance of Humility and Gratitude in Remembering God’s Blessings

The first reading for Corpus Christi Year A from Deuteronomy 8:2-3, 14B-16A reminds us of the importance of humility and gratitude in our relationship with God. The passage describes how the Israelites were led through the wilderness by God and provided for in miraculous ways. They were reminded that God’s provision extended far beyond their material needs – they were given His Word to guide them and sustain them in their journey.

The message we hear on Corpus Christi Year A is still relevant for us today. It is all too easy to become prideful and forgetful of God’s blessings when we are comfortable and things are going well. We might begin to take our possessions or accomplishments for granted, or feel as though we have achieved success on our own merit. However, this passage reminds us that all good things come from God – our talents, our material goods, and even the opportunities that we encounter.

Rather than becoming complacent or boastful, we are called to trust in God’s word and blessings. We are reminded to stay humble and recognize our dependence on God. We should approach our lives with a sense of gratitude, knowing that we have been given so much and recognizing that our lives are sustained by God’s grace.

In practical terms, this might mean setting aside time each day for prayer or meditation, expressing thanks for the blessings in our lives, or simply taking time to acknowledge the people and circumstances that have contributed to our success. By doing so, we cultivate a deeper sense of humility and gratitude, recognizing that all good things come from God and that we are called to be good stewards of the blessings that we have received.

The Eucharist as a Sacrament of Spiritual Unity and Community

The second reading for Corpus Christi Year A from 1 Corinthians 10:16-17 speaks to the centrality of the Eucharist in the life of the Church. It emphasizes the idea that through the Eucharist, we are intimately connected to Christ and to one another in a way that is both physical and spiritual. The Eucharist creates a bond between believers that is based on our shared faith and our shared participation in the sacrifice of Christ.

In a world where we often feel disconnected and isolated from one another, the Eucharist serves as a powerful reminder of the importance of community and our connection to one another in Christ. When we partake in the Eucharist, we are not just consuming bread and wine – we are sharing in the body and blood of Christ, which binds us together as one body in Him.

This sense of unity is especially important in times of crisis, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic, when many of us were unable to physically gather with our fellow believers. The Eucharist served as a tangible reminder of the bonds that connect us to one another and to Christ, even when we are physically separated.

Through the Eucharist, we are sustained by Christ’s love and empowered to love one another as He loves us. It reminds us of the importance of community, and of the role that each of us plays in supporting and encouraging one another on our spiritual journey.

The True Presence of Christ in the Eucharist: A Sacrament of Reverence and Awe

The Gospel reading for Corpus Christi Year A from John 6:51-58 is a powerful reminder of the mystery and depth of Christ’s love for us, and of the transformative power of the Eucharist. In this passage, Jesus speaks of the true presence of His body and blood in the bread and wine of the Eucharist, and the life-giving power that comes from consuming them.

This belief in the true presence of Christ in the Eucharist is central to Catholic theology, and serves as a living reminder of Christ’s sacrifice and the depth of His love for us. When we receive the Eucharist, we are not just partaking in a symbolic act – we are truly receiving the body and blood of Christ, which sustains us and empowers us to live out our faith in the world.

This passage also reminds us of the importance of approaching the Eucharist with reverence and awe. We are not simply consuming bread and wine – we are receiving the body and blood of Christ, and this demands a deep sense of humility and respect. When we receive the Eucharist, we should do so with a spirit of reverence and gratitude, recognizing the profound gift that we are receiving.

In practical terms, this might mean taking time to prepare ourselves spiritually before receiving the Eucharist, through prayer or confession. It might mean taking time after receiving the Eucharist to reflect on the experience and to give thanks for the gift that we have received. It might mean approaching the Eucharist with a sense of wonder and awe, recognizing the mystery and power of this sacrament.

Reflection Questions for Corpus Christi Year A

Sunday June 7, 2026

  • How can we cultivate a spirit of humility and gratitude in our daily lives, especially when things are going well?
  • What role does humility play in your relationship with God? How can you work on staying humble and recognizing your dependence on God?
  • How does the Eucharist create a sense of community and unity among believers? How can we maintain this sense of connection even when we are physically separated?
  • How can you deepen your understanding of the Eucharist as a symbol of spiritual unity?
  • What does it mean to approach the Eucharist with reverence and awe? How can we prepare ourselves spiritually to receive this sacrament?
  • What are some ways in which you can approach the Eucharist with greater reverence and humility?
  • How can you deepen your understanding of the mystery and power of the Eucharist?

Quotes and Social Media Graphics for Corpus Christi Year A

will raise him on the last day
Jesus said to them, “Amen, amen, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you do not have life within you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him on the last day.

Frequently Asked Questions for Corpus Christi Year A

When is Corpus Christi Year A?

The next date is Sunday June 7, 2026.
For other years see the links below:
Corpus Christi Year B
Corpus Christi Year C

What are the Mass readings for Corpus Christi Year A?

The Catholic Mass readings for Sunday June 7, 2026 are:
First Reading – Deuteronomy 8:2-3, 14B-16A: Remember God’s Guidance
Responsorial Psalm – Psalm 147: Praise for God’s Blessings
Second Reading – 1 Corinthians 10:16-17: Sharing in Christ’s Blood and Body
Gospel – John 6:51-58: The Living Bread from Heaven

What Are the themes for the Mass readings for Corpus Christi Year A?

Remembering God’s blessings
Trusting in God’s word
The Eucharist as a sacrament of unity
The true presence of Christ in the Eucharist
The necessity of the Eucharist for eternal life

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