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Baptism of the Lord Year B

The Baptism of the Lord is celebrated on the Sunday after January 6. When the Feast of the Epiphany falls on Sunday January 7 or Sunday January 8, then the Baptism of the Lord is observed on Monday instead.

Mass Readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

  • First ReadingIsaiah 42:1-4, 6-7: The Lord delights in His servant, endowed with His spirit, to bring justice gently and quietly to nations, freeing the oppressed and guiding the world in righteousness.
  • Alternate First ReadingIsaiah 55:1-11: The Lord invites all to freely receive His abundance, promising an everlasting covenant and mercy. His ways surpass ours, and His word, like rain, fulfills its purpose on earth.
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 29: Divine beings are called to honor the Lord’s glory and majesty. His powerful voice thunders over waters, reigning eternally, promising peace to His people.
  • Alternate Responsorial PsalmIsaiah 12: Confident in the Lord as my salvation and strength, I joyfully draw from His deliverance. Proclaim His deeds and sing of His greatness, for He dwells magnificently among us.
  • Second ReadingActs 10:34-38: Peter realizes God shows no favoritism; anyone from any nation who respects Him and acts righteously is accepted. He recounts Jesus’ works, anointed to heal and do good.
  • Alternate Second Reading1 John 5:1-9: Believing in Jesus as the Messiah means loving God and His children, obeying His commandments, not burdensome but a path to overcoming the world. God’s testimony affirms Jesus.
  • GospelMark 1:7-11: John the Baptist, proclaiming the coming of one greater than himself, baptized with water but foretold of a baptism with the Holy Spirit by the coming one. Jesus from Nazareth was baptized by John in the Jordan River. Upon emerging, Jesus witnessed the heavens opening, the Spirit descending like a dove upon Him, and heard a divine voice affirming Him as the beloved Son, expressing divine pleasure in Him.

It happened in those days that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized in the Jordan by John. On coming up out of the water he saw the heavens being torn open and the Spirit, like a dove, descending upon him.

Mark 1:9-11

Themes for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

The Feast of the Baptism of the Lord Year B emphasizes our incorporation into God’s family through baptism, mirroring Jesus’ own baptism. The first reading discusses being formed and called by God, while the alternate first reading invites a closer relationship with Him. The psalm and its alternate both highlight themes of peace, water, and salvation, integral to the baptismal experience.

The second reading reflects on the start of the Good News with Jesus’ baptism, and the alternate second reading mentions the testimony of the Spirit, water, and blood. The Gospel vividly recounts Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist in the Jordan, symbolizing the beginning of His ministry and our own spiritual journey in baptism.

The liturgy for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, with its specific readings, presents several interwoven themes that are central to understanding this feast and its significance:

  1. Divine Servanthood and Justice: The first reading from Isaiah 42 highlights the role of the servant of the Lord, anointed with the Spirit to bring forth justice. This theme connects directly to the baptism of Jesus, where He is revealed as this servant, endowed with the Spirit to fulfill God’s mission of salvation and justice.
  2. Salvation and Praise: The Responsorial Psalm from Isaiah 12 emphasizes God as the source of salvation and strength. This resonates with the baptismal theme of salvation, where baptism is seen as the beginning of our salvation journey in Christ.
  3. Faith, Love, and Obedience: The second reading from 1 John 5 connects faith in Jesus as the Messiah with the love for God and His commandments. This reading highlights the Christian life following baptism, marked by faith, love, and obedience to God’s will.
  4. Revelation of Jesus as the Son of God: The Gospel from Mark 1 vividly depicts the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. This event is pivotal, revealing Jesus as the beloved Son of God and marking the beginning of His public ministry. The descent of the Holy Spirit like a dove and the voice from heaven affirm Jesus’ divine sonship and mission.
  5. The Baptism of Jesus as a Model for Christian Baptism: This feast also reflects on the significance of Christian baptism. Just as Jesus was baptized by John, Christians are baptized into Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. This sacrament is seen as an entry into the Christian community and a sharing in the life of Christ.
  6. Transformation and the Holy Spirit: The baptism of Jesus marks the anointing of the Holy Spirit upon Him. This theme extends to Christian baptism, where the baptized are also anointed with the Spirit, signifying a transformation and new life in Christ.

In homilies, discussions, or lessons, these themes can be explored to deepen the understanding of the Baptism of the Lord Year B, reflecting on its implications for Christian life and discipleship. See the Homilies and Reflections section and the More Thoughts section for further expansion on these readings and some reflection questions for the Baptism of the Lord Year B.

Resources for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

Sunday January 10, 2027

beloved lesson plan on baptism

Beloved – A Baptism Lesson Plan

This lesson plan is based on the gospel for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, Mark 1:7-11. In Jesus’ baptism, He is declared God’s beloved Son, paralleling our baptismal identity as beloved children of God. This sacrament marks us permanently, symbolizing God’s unwavering love and our membership in His family. It cleanses us from original sin and bestows the Holy Spirit’s gifts, initiating us into the Christian community. This lesson reminds us of our value to God and our connection with the global family of the baptized, transcending denominations and cultures, emphasizing unity and diversity in the Christian faith.

Drip Drip Drop Game

Drip Drip Drop Game

The “Drip Drip Drop Game” is a fun, water-based variation of “Duck Duck Goose,” ideal for teenagers. Using a small cup and a pitcher of water, participants sit in a circle. One player, designated as “It,” walks around the circle, dripping water on each person’s head while saying “Drip.” Suddenly, “It” pours the remaining water on someone, declaring “Drop.” The drenched player then chases “It” around the circle. If caught before “It” reaches their spot, the chaser becomes the new “It.” The game, suitable for indoor play with some clean-up, adds excitement and a refreshing twist to a classic game, perfect for an engaging youth activity for the Baptism of the Lord Year B.

Prayer to the Lord of Majesty Based on Psalm 29

Prayer to the Lord of Majesty

Based on Psalm 29, the responsorial psalm for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, this prayer exalts God as the Lord of Majesty and King of the World. It expresses a deep sense of devotion and surrender, acknowledging that all we have is a gift from God and thus rightfully belongs to Him. The prayer highlights the power and clarity of God’s voice, likened to thunder, with creation responding in a chorus of glory. It recognizes God’s sovereignty over all creation and humbly asks for strength to serve Him faithfully and for the gift of peace. This prayer beautifully encapsulates the themes of awe, reverence, and commitment in our relationship with God.

Water Drop Race

Water Drop Race

The “Water Drop Race” is an ideal indoor game for the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord Year B. It involves guiding a water drop across wax paper, symbolizing the journey of the baptized in faith. The game emphasizes the themes of guidance, unity, and community, reflecting the essence of baptism. Its simplicity makes it suitable for all ages, serving as a metaphor for the strength and cohesion of the Christian community. This activity can enrich discussions or celebrations related to baptism, highlighting its communal and nurturing aspects.

paper plate dove craft 1

Paper Plate Dove Craft

The “Paper Plate Dove Craft” is an excellent, age-inclusive activity that can beautifully complement teachings about the Holy Spirit, particularly fitting for the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord Year B. This craft, made using simple paper plates, is not only easy to create but also versatile. For instance, crafting multiple doves from smaller plates and stringing them together to form a mobile can be a visually appealing project.

You Are My Beloved – Discussion and Reflection Questions

The “You Are My Beloved” discussion and reflection, based on the Gospel for the Baptism of the Lord Year B (Mark 1:7-11), invites youth to explore how God expresses His love through baptism. The Gospel account describes the Holy Spirit descending like a dove and God the Father proclaiming Jesus as His cherished son. This reflects the Trinity’s dynamics—God’s love (the Father), the beloved (the Son), and the love’s manifestation (the Holy Spirit). Baptism, a sacrament of profound significance, not only cleanses original sin but also marks us as God’s adopted children. It symbolically represents God’s loving embrace, welcoming us into His family and affirming us as His “beloved,” instilling a deep desire for closeness with Him.

Baptism Word Search Puzzle

The “Baptism Word Search Puzzle,” designed for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, is an educational and engaging tool for teaching children about the sacrament of baptism. It features words related to this vital sacrament, one of the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church, marking a new beginning and entry into the Christian community. This puzzle is more than just a game; it’s a celebration of joy, reflection, and renewal associated with baptism. As children search for and find baptism-related words, they learn about the symbols, concepts, and significance of baptism, fostering a deeper understanding and appreciation of their faith and this crucial rite of initiation.

The Book of Isaiah

Background Information on the Book of Isaiah

The Book of Isaiah, with its prophetic visions and messages, holds a significant place in the context of the Baptism of the Lord Year B. Isaiah’s themes of reform, rejuvenation, and God’s commitment to His people resonate deeply with this feast, which celebrates the baptism of Jesus and symbolizes the beginning of His public ministry. The servant songs in Isaiah, foretelling the suffering and resurrection of Christ, provide a profound backdrop to understand Jesus’ baptism as the commencement of His journey towards fulfilling these prophecies. Studying Isaiah can enrich our appreciation of this feast, deepening our understanding of Jesus’ mission and its implications for our faith and salvation.

The Acts of the Apostles

Acts of the Apostles

In the context of the Baptism of the Lord Year B, the second reading from Acts 10:34-38 is particularly poignant. It recounts Peter’s realization that God shows no favoritism and accepts all who act righteously, mirroring the universal call and acceptance symbolized in Jesus’ baptism.

This passage from the Acts of the Apostles, detailing the early Church’s growth and the apostles’ mission post-ascension, underscores the baptismal theme of being anointed for service. Just as Jesus was anointed to heal and do good, our baptism calls us to a life of righteousness and service. Understanding this reading in Acts enriches our perception of baptism not just as a personal sacrament, but as a commission to participate in the universal mission of the Church.

First Letter of John

1 John: Exploring the Depths of Love and Truth

The message of 1 John centers on the profound themes of love, faith, and obedience. It teaches that belief in Jesus Christ as the Son of God is foundational to Christian life. This faith, born of God’s love, calls believers to love God and one another, creating a harmonious relationship between faith and action. In 1 John 5:1-9, the second reading for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, this message is highlighted through the affirmation of Jesus’ divine sonship, symbolized in His baptism. It emphasizes that Jesus’ baptism, His blood, and the Spirit testify to His identity and mission, urging believers to embrace and witness these truths in their lives.

the gospel of st mark

Resources and Reflections for the Gospel of Mark

The Gospel for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, Mark 1:7-11, captures a pivotal moment in Jesus’ life. John the Baptist baptizes Jesus in the Jordan River, marking a significant transition from preparation to action in Jesus’ mission. As Jesus emerges from the water, the heavens open, and the Holy Spirit descends like a dove, while a divine voice declares Jesus as the beloved Son. This profound event not only publicly affirms Jesus’ identity as the Son of God but also signifies the beginning of His public ministry. It’s a moment of divine endorsement and empowerment, setting the stage for His subsequent journey, teachings, and ultimately, His redemptive work.

Homilies and Reflections for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

Sunday January 10, 2027

The Baptism of the Lord

In his reflection on the Baptism of the Lord Year, Jeff Cavins discusses the significance of Jesus’ baptism in Luke chapter 3, emphasizing how it marked the start of His public ministry from the lowest geographical point on earth. Cavins highlights that Jesus’ baptism, though not for repentance, was to fulfill all righteousness and set an example for us. He relates this to our baptism, where we are forgiven of original sin, welcomed into God’s family, and empowered by the Holy Spirit. Cavins encourages us to follow Jesus’ example, emphasizing that, like Him, our baptism and confirmation equip us to be courageous witnesses and active participants in God’s plan of sheer goodness.

The Centrality of Baptism

Fr. John Muir reflects on the importance of baptism, which is significant for the Baptism of the Lord Year B. He describes baptism as a new birth into spiritual life, akin to physical birth, and emphasizes its significance through St. Paul’s words in Romans. Baptism is not just an initiation or a momentary event; it’s the beginning of life as a beloved child of God. He connects baptism to various aspects of Catholic life, including Mass, reading the Bible, and sacraments, all fostering the life given at baptism. This new life in God’s family extends to love for the poor and understanding the Church as the expanded family.

The God Who Enters Our Muddy Waters

In his homily for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, Bishop Robert Barron reflects on the Gospel of Mark 1:7-11, emphasizing the significance of Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist. He addresses the early Church’s embarrassment about Jesus undergoing a baptism of repentance, traditionally meant for sinners. Barron suggests that this apparent contradiction highlights a profound truth: Jesus’ solidarity with humanity in its sinfulness. He interprets Jesus’ baptism as an act of identification with sinners, demonstrating God’s willingness to join humanity in its fallen state. This act foreshadows Jesus’ ultimate sacrifice, where He becomes the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, reconciling humanity with God and inviting us into the Trinitarian life.

Priest, Prophet, and King

In his homily for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, Bishop Robert Barron emphasizes that through baptism, we participate in Christ’s roles as priest, prophet, and king. This participation may seem odd but is essential in understanding our union with Christ. Barron explains that being baptized grafts us onto Christ, sharing in His divine mission. He urges the baptized to embrace these roles: as priests through prayer and intercession, as prophets by speaking God’s word, and as kings through spiritual leadership and guidance. This active participation in Christ’s ministry, Barron suggests, is fundamental to living out our baptismal promises and honoring the Feast of Jesus’ baptism.

More Thoughts for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

Embracing the Call: A Reflection on the Baptism of the Lord Year B

The Prophetic Invitation

The readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B begin with an invitation from Isaiah 55:1-11, a call to freely receive God’s abundance and mercy. This passage sets the tone for the day’s reflection, highlighting God’s gracious invitation to all. It reminds us of the divine generosity that surpasses human understanding, a generosity that culminates in the baptism of Jesus. As Isaiah speaks of God’s word fulfilling its purpose like rain nourishing the earth, we see a parallel in the baptismal waters that initiate a new era in salvation history.

The Affirmation of Identity

The heart of this feast is found in the Gospel for the Baptism of the Lord Year B from Mark 1:7-11. John the Baptist, a prophetic figure preparing the way, baptizes Jesus in the Jordan River. This moment is transformative not only for Jesus but for all of humanity. As Jesus emerges from the water, the heavens open, and the Spirit descends like a dove, a scene rich in symbolism and meaning.

This event marks the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry, but more than that, it reveals His identity as the beloved Son of God. In this act of baptism, God publicly affirms Jesus, not only as His Son but as the One in whom He finds joy and pleasure.

This moment in the Jordan River is not just about Jesus; it speaks to each one of us. In our baptism, we too are claimed as God’s beloved children. The voice that declared Jesus as beloved echoes through time, calling each baptized individual into a special relationship with God. This affirmation of identity is crucial; it reminds us that before we do anything, we are loved and cherished by God.

Our baptism also anoints us as priest, prophet, and king. We are called to serve as part of the universal priesthood, to courageously speak God’s truth as prophets, even when it’s unpopular, and to strive to grow the Kingdom of God as kings. Jesus’ sharing in our baptism enables us to share in these roles with Him. Receiving the Spirit at baptism empowers us to participate actively in Christ’s ministry. Our baptism is not just a symbol; it is a call to action, a mandate to live out these anointed roles in our daily lives.

Living as God’s Beloved

In the second reading for the Baptism of the Lord Year B, 1 John 5:1-9, we find an expansion of this theme of belovedness. Belief in Jesus as the Messiah, the reading tells us, is synonymous with loving God and obeying His commandments. This obedience is not burdensome; rather, it is the natural response of the beloved children of God. Our faith in Jesus and our baptismal identity compel us to live in a certain way, loving God and our neighbors, just as Jesus did.

The Baptism of the Lord Year B invites us into a deep reflection on our identity and calling as baptized Christians. We are reminded of God’s abundant invitation to us, a call that Jesus Himself answered in the Jordan River. We are affirmed as God’s beloved, just as Jesus was, and this identity shapes our way of living.

Our response to this identity should be one of love, obedience, and proclamation, drawing strength and joy from our relationship with God. The readings for this feast challenge us to live as true children of God, embodying the love, grace, and mercy that our baptism signifies, and to actively embrace our anointed roles as priest, prophet, and king in the world.

Reflection Questions for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

  • Exploring Isaiah’s Invitation: How do you personally respond to the invitation in Isaiah 55:1-11 to receive God’s abundance and mercy? In what ways do you see God’s word, like rain, fulfilling its purpose in your life?
  • Understanding Our Baptismal Identity: Reflecting on Mark 1:7-11, how does the affirmation of Jesus as God’s beloved Son at His baptism resonate with your understanding of your identity as a baptized Christian? In what ways do you feel called and affirmed by God?
  • Embracing Our Anointed Roles: Consider the roles of priest, prophet, and king that you received at your baptism. How do you actively live out these roles in your daily life? Can you identify moments where you have served others, spoken God’s truth, or worked to expand His Kingdom?
  • The Call to Love and Obedience: Reflect on 1 John 5:1-9. How does your belief in Jesus as the Messiah influence your ability to love God and others? Do you find His commandments burdensome or a path to overcoming the world?
  • Drawing Strength from Salvation: Isaiah 12 speaks of drawing joyfully from the wells of salvation. How do you draw strength and joy from your relationship with God? Are there specific practices or aspects of your faith that renew your sense of salvation?
  • Living Out the Baptismal Call: How does your baptismal call to action manifest in your everyday life? Are there areas where you feel challenged to respond more fully to this call?
  • The Trinity in Our Lives: Reflect on the relationship between the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as presented in the readings. How do you experience the presence and work of the Trinity in your life?
  • Witnessing God’s Love in Community: Considering your role in the Christian community, how do you witness and contribute to the love and unity that baptism symbolizes? In what ways can you strengthen your participation in this community?
  • Renewal and Commitment: How can you renew your commitment to live out your baptismal promises? Are there specific actions or changes you feel called to make as a result of this reflection?
  • The Power of God’s Word in Your Life: Reflecting on the analogy of God’s word as rain in Isaiah, how do you see God’s word nurturing and growing your faith? How can you more actively engage with God’s word in your daily life?

Quotes and Social Media Graphics for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

seek the lord
All you who are thirsty, come to the water! You who have no money, come, receive grain and eat; come, without paying and without cost, drink wine and milk! Why spend your money for what is not bread, your wages for what fails to satisfy? … Seek the Lord while he may be found, call him while he is near.
Baptism of the Lord Year B
The Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

Music Suggestions for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

Sunday January 10, 2027

For the Baptism of the Lord Year B, music plays a pivotal role in enhancing the liturgical experience. The selected hymns should resonate with the themes of baptism, divine love, and new beginnings, as highlighted in the readings. Ideal choices would include songs that reflect on Jesus’ baptism, the Holy Spirit’s role, and our own baptismal call to discipleship. The following list offers a blend of traditional and contemporary hymns, each echoing the celebration’s key messages and inviting deeper reflection on this significant feast.

Frequently Asked Questions for the Baptism of the Lord Year B

What date is the Baptism of the Lord Year B?

The next date is Sunday January 10, 2027.
For other years see the links below:
Baptism of the Lord Year A
Baptism of the Lord Year C
The Baptism of the Lord is celebrated on the Sunday after January 6. When the Feast of the Epiphany falls on Sunday January 7 or Sunday January 8, then the Baptism of the Lord is observed on Monday instead.

What are the Mass readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B ?

The Mass readings for Sunday January 10, 2027 are:

  • First ReadingIsaiah 42:1-4, 6-7: The Servant of Justice
  • Alternate First ReadingIsaiah 55:1-11: Everlasting Covenant and Mercy
  • Responsorial PsalmPsalm 29: Majestic Voice of the Lord
  • Alternate Responsorial PsalmIsaiah 12: Salvation’s Joyful Wellspring
  • Second ReadingActs 10:34-38: Universal Welcome in God
  • Alternate Second Reading1 John 5:1-9: Faith and Love in Christ
  • GospelMark 1:7-11: Jesus’ Baptism

What is the significance of the Baptism of the Lord in the liturgical calendar?

The Baptism of the Lord Year B marks the end of the Christmas season and the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry. It is a feast that celebrates Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist in the Jordan River, highlighting His identity as the Son of God and the start of His redemptive mission.

Why is the Baptism of the Lord Year B important for Christians today?

This feast reminds Christians of their own baptism and the calling to live as disciples of Christ. It’s a time to reflect on our identity as beloved children of God and our commitment to living out the teachings of Jesus.

Is there a specific color associated with the Baptism of the Lord Year B?

The liturgical color for the Baptism of the Lord is white, symbolizing purity, joy, and the glory of the Lord.

How does the Baptism of the Lord Year B connect to the themes of Epiphany?

The Baptism of the Lord Year B continues the revelation of Jesus’ divine nature, first celebrated at Epiphany. It reveals Jesus as the beloved Son of God and the Light of the world.

Can the Baptism of the Lord Year B inspire Christian service and mission?

Yes, this feast can inspire believers to renew their commitment to Christian service and mission, as it emphasizes following Jesus’ example and responding to our baptismal call to serve.

How can the Baptism of the Lord Year B enhance our understanding of the Trinity?

This feast provides an opportunity to reflect on the Trinity, especially through the Gospel reading, where the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are all present at Jesus’ baptism, revealing the interrelationship within the Godhead.

What is the central theme of the First Reading from Isaiah 55:1-11 for the Baptism of the Lord Year B?

The central theme is God’s invitation to all people to freely receive His abundance, mercy, and the promise of an everlasting covenant. It emphasizes that God’s ways and words are powerful and purposeful, like rain that nourishes the earth.

How does Isaiah 12, used as the Responsorial Psalm, complement the Baptism of the Lord Year B?

Isaiah 12 complements the Baptism of the Lord Year B by expressing confidence in the Lord as a source of salvation and strength. It encourages joyfully drawing from God’s deliverance and highlights the importance of proclaiming His deeds and recognizing His presence among us.

In the context of the Baptism of the Lord Year B, what message does 1 John 5:1-9 convey?

In the context of the Baptism of the Lord Year B, 1 John 5:1-9 conveys that belief in Jesus as the Messiah is linked to loving God and His children, and to the obedience of His commandments. It stresses that these commandments are not burdensome but are a means to overcome the world, reinforcing God’s testimony about Jesus.

How does the Gospel reading from Mark 1:7-11 enhance our understanding of the Baptism of the Lord Year B?

The Gospel reading from Mark 1:7-11 vividly depicts Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist and is central to the Baptism of the Lord Year B. It shows the Holy Spirit descending upon Jesus and God affirming Jesus as His beloved Son, highlighting Jesus’ identity and the beginning of His ministry.

What connections can be drawn between the readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B and our own baptism?

The readings invite reflection on the grace and calling we receive in our baptism. Like Jesus, we are affirmed as beloved children of God, called to live in accordance with His will and to bear witness to His love and salvation.

How do the readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B speak to the concept of divine calling and service?

These readings emphasize God’s call to each of us to embrace His abundance, to trust in His salvation, to obey His commandments out of love, and to follow Jesus’ example of service and ministry, reaffirming our baptismal commitment to Christian discipleship.

Can the readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B be related to the contemporary Christian experience?

Absolutely. The themes of divine invitation, affirmation, obedience, and service are timeless and speak profoundly to the contemporary Christian experience, reminding us of our ongoing journey in faith and our response to God’s enduring love and call.

How do these readings inspire a deeper understanding of Jesus’ mission as revealed at His baptism?

The readings for the Baptism of the Lord Year B shed light on Jesus’ mission as the beloved Son of God, called to bring salvation. They inspire us to see His baptism as the beginning of a ministry focused on love, service, and the fulfillment of God’s redemptive plan.

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